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[ What Is Esophagitis? How Is Esophagitis Treated? ]

What Is Esophagitis? How Is Esophagitis Treated?

Illu01 head neck Esophagitis (UK: Oesophagitis) is inflammation of the esophagus. The esophagus is a muscular tube from the pharynx to the stomach through which food and drinks pass. Esophagitis damages esophagus tissue. Patients may experience problems swallowing, as well as chest pains ( heartburn ). It is much more common in adults than in children. In some cases, untreated esophagitis can lead to alterations in the structure and function of the esophagus. According to a review of the Swedish National Rergister, esophagitis rates (diagnosed by endoscopy) are less than 5% among people aged 55 years. Other studies have estimated the prevalence in the same age group at around 2%. If diagnosed rapidly and treated properly, the prognosis for esophagitis is usually good. Prognosis also depends on the underlying disease process.

Physicians Show Bias When Diagnosing Stomach Problems According To Study

Patients who complain of upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms often face a diagnosis of either gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ) or functional dyspepsia. Because the two conditions often overlap, it can be difficult to distinguish between them and diagnose them properly. Yet ambulatory care facilities and hospitals have reported a dramatic increase in the number of GERD-related visits/discharges in recent years. This led a team of researchers at Mayo Clinic, others from the United States, Europe and Australia to question if "observer bias" plays a role in the diagnosis of GERD, compared to a diagnosis of functional dyspepsia. As reported during the American College of Gastroenterology 2011 Annual Scientific Meeting and Postgraduate Course, such a bias exists and increases the likelihood of a diagnosis of GERD.

Prescribing Acid-Suppressing Drugs To Infants

Frequent spitting up, irritability, and unexplained crying in infants can be very distressing to parents. Pediatricians often prescribe acid-suppressing drugs for these symptoms in an effort to treat infants for gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ); however, GERD is an uncommon cause of these symptoms in otherwise thriving infants. In a soon to be published Commentary in The Journal of Pediatrics, Eric Hassall, MBChB, FRCPC, FACG, cautions against the over-diagnosis of GERD and over-prescription of acid-suppressing drugs in infants. Dr. Hassall is affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, is currently Staff Gastroenterologist at Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation in San Francisco, California, and is an advisor to the U.

Prescribing Of Acid-suppressing Medication For Infants Rises Considerably

Infants who are frequently spitting up, irritable, and cry for unknown reasons can be extremely worrying for parents. The infants are often prescribed with acid-suppressing drugs by their pediatricians in an attempt to treat them for gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ) but in otherwise thriving infants GERD is not a common cause of these symptoms. Eric Hassall, MBChB, FRCPC, FACG, warns against the over-diagnosis of GERD and over-prescription of these drugs in infants, in a Commentary that is soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics. Dr. Hassall is affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, is at present Staff Gastroenterologist at Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation in San Francisco, California, and an advisor to the U.

Acid-Suppressing Drugs Being Over Prescribed In Infants

Frequent spitting up, irritability and unexplained crying in infants are often very distressing to parents. Physicians frequently prescribe acid-suppressing drugs for these symptoms. However, gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ) is an uncommon cause of these symptoms in otherwise thriving infants, and in his Commentary published in the October 20th issue of The Journal of Pediatrics, Dr. Eric Hassall cautions against the over-diagnosis of GERD and over-prescription of acid-suppressing drugs in this age group, ie, under 1 year of age. Dr. Hassall, Staff Pediatric Gastroenterologist at Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation in San Francisco, part of the Sutter Health network, and an advisor to the US Food and Drug Administration, traces the history and current uses of acid-suppressing medication in children and infants, mostly focusing on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

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