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[ Genetic Mutation Leads To Cold Allergy, Immune Deficiency And Autoimmunity ]

Genetic Mutation Leads To Cold Allergy, Immune Deficiency And Autoimmunity

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health have identified a genetic mutation in three unrelated families that causes a rare immune disorder characterized by excessive and impaired immune function. Symptoms of this condition include immune deficiency, autoimmunity, inflammatory skin disorders and cold-induced hives, a condition known as cold urticaria. The study was led by Joshua Milner, M.D., in the Laboratory of Allergic Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and Daniel Kastner, M.D., Ph.D., scientific director at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). It appears in the online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. The mutation discovered occurs in a gene for phospholipase C-gamma2 (PLCG2), an enzyme involved in the activation of immune cells.

Get Ready For Spring - Hay Fever Worse In Spring Than Summer

Hay fever (runny nose, sneezing, itchy eyes) is caused by an allergy to pollen, and most commonly to grass pollen. These tiny grains bring misery to sufferers through spring and summer and pollen levels are often included as part of weather reports to help sufferers prepare. However new research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Clinical and Translational Allergy shows that, regardless of medication and other allergies, for the same grass pollen levels, hay fever symptoms are worse in the first half of the season than later on. Worldwide there are over 10, 000 species of grass and most of these species are able to cause symptoms in people who have hay fever. The different species release their pollen sequentially so that, for a sufferer, hay fever, also called seasonal allergic rhinitis, can last for the whole three months that grasses are flowering.

Perrigo Announces FDA Final Approval For Desloratadine

Perrigo Company (Nasdaq: PRGO; TASE) announced that it has received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) for Desloratadine tablets (5 mg). Perrigo had been sued for patent infringement based upon its filing of an ANDA containing a Paragraph IV certification and settled the case in 2008. Under the terms of the settlement, Perrigo can commercially launch its generic Desloratadine product on July 1, 2012, or earlier in certain circumstances. The new product launch may be a prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) product depending on its status at the time of launch. This product is an AB-rating as equivalent to Schering-Plough's Clarinex ® tablets (5 mg) indicated for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis and perennial allergic rhinitis.

Allergy Tests Are No Magic Bullets For Diagnosis

An advisory from two leading allergists, Robert Wood of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and Scott Sicherer of Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, urges clinicians to use caution when ordering allergy tests and to avoid making a diagnosis based solely on test results. In an article, published in the January issue of Pediatrics, the researchers warn that blood tests, an increasingly popular diagnostic tool in recent years, and skin-prick testing, an older weapon in the allergist's arsenal, should never be used as standalone diagnostic strategies. These tests, Sicherer and Wood say, should be used only to confirm suspicion and never to look for allergies in an asymptomatic patient. Test results, they add, should be interpreted in the context of a patient's symptoms and medical history.

Memo To Pediatricians, Allergy Tests Are No Magic Bullets For Diagnosis

An advisory from two leading allergists, Robert Wood of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and Scott Sicherer of Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, urges clinicians to use caution when ordering allergy tests and to avoid making a diagnosis based solely on test results. In an article, published in the January issue of Pediatrics, the researchers warn that blood tests, an increasingly popular diagnostic tool in recent years, and skin-prick testing, an older weapon in the allergist's arsenal, should never be used as standalone diagnostic strategies. These tests, Sicherer and Wood say, should be used only to confirm suspicion and never to look for allergies in an asymptomatic patient. Test results, they add, should be interpreted in the context of a patient's symptoms and medical history.

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