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[ ADHD - Four Genes Linked To The Disorder ]

ADHD - Four Genes Linked To The Disorder

Four gene variants, all members of the glutamate receptor gene family, appear to be involved in vital brain signaling pathways in a sub-set of children with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), researchers from the Center for Applied Genomics at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia reported in the journal Nature Genetics. The authors add that their findings could help create drugs that target those pathways, offering potential therapies for ADHD patients with those specific gene variants. There are an estimated half-a-million American children with ADHD and these gene variants. Study leader Hakon Hakonarson, M.D., Ph.D., said: "At least 10 percent of the ADHD patients in our sample have these particular genetic variants. The genes involved affect neurotransmitter systems in the brain that have been implicated in ADHD, and we now have a genetic explanation for this link that applies to a subset of children with the disorder.

Defects In Brain Signaling Pathways Suggested By New Gene Study Of ADHD

Pediatric researchers analyzing genetic influences in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD ) have found alterations in specific genes involved in important brain signaling pathways. The study raises the possibility that drugs acting on those pathways might offer a new treatment option for patients with ADHD who have those gene variants - potentially, half a million U.S. children. "At least 10 percent of the ADHD patients in our sample have these particular genetic variants, " said study leader Hakon Hakonarson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for Applied Genomics at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "The genes involved affect neurotransmitter systems in the brain that have been implicated in ADHD, and we now have a genetic explanation for this link that applies to a subset of children with the disorder.

fMRI Reveals Functional Brain Pathways Disrupted In Children With ADHD

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers have identified abnormalities in the brains of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD ) that may serve as a biomarker for the disorder, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). ADHD is one of the most common childhood disorders, affecting an estimated five to eight percent of school-aged children. Symptoms, which may continue into adulthood, include inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity behaviors that are out of the normal range for a child's age and development. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, there is no single test capable of diagnosing a child with the disorder. As a result, difficult children are often incorrectly labeled with ADHD while other children with the disorder remain undiagnosed.

Women Need ADHD Meds As Well ...

ADHD is usually thought of as a predominantly male problem, but a new report from Medco Health Solutions shows the number of women taking medication for ADHD is rising rapidly. Researchers studied trends in the use of mental health medications among about 2.5 million insured Americans and found that the number of women aged 20 to 44 on ADHD medicines shot up 250% from 2001 to 2010. In general, amongst women aged 20 to 44 around one in 50 took medicine to control ADHD. One factor that might play a role is the approval for use of all five medicines since 2001. Dr. Lenard Adler, director of the Psychiatry and Neurology Adult ADHD Program at the New York University School of Medicine, says that many of the women might have been outside of regular statistics until they became adults. The problem doesn't usually crop up later in life, its generally thought of as a childhood / teenage problem.

Performance Linked To Changes In Human Brain Structure Function: Findings Explore Complexities Of How The Brain Learns, Stores, And Recalls Info

New research just released provides insight into one of neuroscience's most intriguing mysteries: how the human brain learns and remembers. These studies - involving topics as diverse as musical memory, "change blindness, " and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD ) - illustrate the profound influence that specific changes in either the brain's structure, function, or both, can have on human behavior. The research findings were presented at Neuroscience 2011, the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. Specifically, the studies show that: Two brain regions associated with personal recollections and obsessive compulsive disorder are larger in individuals with highly superior autobiographical memory, a rare condition that allows people to remember nearly every event of their lives (Aurora Leport, abstract 603.

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