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[ Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk, Even If You Start Late ]

Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk, Even If You Start Late

Doing exercise every day can considerably reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if you start becoming physically active after 80 years of age, researchers from Rush University Medical Center reported in the journal Neurology. Increased physical activity may include becoming involved in daily chores, such as housework, the authors added. Lead author, Dr. Aron S. Buchman, said: "The results of our study indicate that all physical activities including exercise as well as other activities such as cooking, washing the dishes, and cleaning are associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease. These results provide support for efforts to encourage all types of physical activity even in very old adults who might not be able to participate in formal exercise, but can still benefit from a more active lifestyle.

Alzheimer's Disease Risk May Be Reduced At Any Age By Daily Physical Activity

Daily physical activity may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline, even in people over the age of 80, according to a new study by neurological researchers from Rush University Medical Center that will be published in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "The results of our study indicate that all physical activities including exercise as well as other activities such as cooking, washing the dishes, and cleaning are associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, " said Dr. Aron S. Buchman, lead author of the study and associate professor of neurological sciences at Rush. "These results provide support for efforts to encourage all types of physical activity even in very old adults who might not be able to participate in formal exercise, but can still benefit from a more active lifestyle.

Boxing Likely To Cause Damage To The Brain

Olympic boxers can exhibit changes in brain fluids after bouts, which indicates nerve cell damage. This is shown in a study of 30 top-level Swedish boxers that was conducted at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, in collaboration with the Swedish Boxing Federation, published in PLoS ONE. It has been debated for quite some time whether Olympic boxing (amateur boxing) is hazardous to the brain. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, joined with colleagues at the Faculty of Health Sciences at Link├ ping University and the Swedish Boxing Association in conducting a unique study of 30 top-level Swedish boxers and 25 reference persons. Brain injury similar to Alzheimer┬ s The study shows that repeated blows to the head in the boxing ring can produce a release of brain injury markers to the brain fluid, similar to what is seen with after other types of head trauma, as well as in neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer┬ s.

Two Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins Linked To Alzheimer's Disease In Seemingly Healthy Patients

A study published in Archives of Neurology demonstrated that the connection between two cerebrospinal fluid proteins that are linked to Alzheimer's disease in clinically and cognitively normal older patients shows that amyloid-╬ (A╬ )-associated clinical decline was linked to the presence of higher phospho-tau (p-tau). According to the researchers, as therapeutic interventions to prevent dementia are developed, it is vital to identify older individuals destined to developed Alzheimer disease (AD). Rahul S. Desikan, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine, and his team assessed 107 healthy people from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The the team used the global Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale and the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale in order to analyze the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of phospho-tau 181 (p-tau 181p ) and CSF A╬ 1-42 with clinical decline.

'Use It Or Lose It' - Protecting Your Brain

The findings of a new study suggest that the protective effects of an active cognitive lifestyle arise through multiple biological pathways. For some time researchers have been aware of a link between what we do with our brains and the long term risk for dementia. In general, those who are more mentally active or maintain an active cognitive lifestyle throughout their lives are at lower risk. "The ideas of a 'brain reserve' or 'cognitive reserve' have been suggested to explain this, but were basically a black box. This research throws some light on what may be happening at the biological level, " said Associate Professor Michael J. Valenzuela, a brain aging expert at the Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Australia, who led this new study. Researchers used data from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study, a large population-based study in the United Kingdom that has been following over 13, 000 elderly individuals prospectively since 1991.


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