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[ Youth With Mood And Anxiety Disorders: Easy Access And Age-Specific Treatment Could Lead To Better Care ]

Youth With Mood And Anxiety Disorders: Easy Access And Age-Specific Treatment Could Lead To Better Care

74% of mental illnesses emerge by age 25. Mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common conditions, yet there is little support for youth in this age group. A new study from Lawson Health Research Institute shows that may no longer be the case. Dr. Elizabeth Osuch, Lawson researcher and a psychiatrist at London Health Sciences Centre, heads up the First Episode Mood and Anxiety Program (FEMAP), a treatment and clinical research program geared specifically to youth ages 16-26. Traditionally, youth can only access these specialized services through a physician referral, but FEMAP allows potential patients to refer themselves. Dr. Osuch believes this could help professionals to better connect with those at risk, and to intervene before the young person's development is impacted.

Student Research To Be Discussed At A National Conference Dedicated To The Advancement Of Treating Anxiety Disorders

Stress and anxiety among Americans is under increasing concern - in the doctor's office, in the workplace and at home. UC student researchers will be examining different facets of the crisis as they take part in a national conference aimed at bringing relief to that suffering. UC graduate and undergraduate research posters will be presented at the 32nd annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, which will be held April 12-15 in Arlington, Va. All of the student researchers are under the mentorship of Alison Mcleish, a UC assistant professor of psychology. Three graduate students and four undergraduate research assistants will represent the UC Department of Psychology at the conference. Here's a roundup of the poster presentations: The Role of Distress Tolerance in Excessive Worry Description: Excessive worry, the defining feature of generalized anxiety disorder, has been identified as a cognitive avoidance strategy to reduce emotional experiences.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder May Lead To Impaired Relationships Between Affected Children And Their Mothers

A new study from Case Western Reserve University finds mothers tend to be more critical of children with obsessive-compulsive disorder than they are of other children in the family. And, that parental criticism is linked to poorer outcomes for the child after treatment. Parent criticism has been associated with child anxiety in the past, however, researchers wanted to find out if this is a characteristic of the parent or something specific to the relationship between the anxious child and the parent. "This suggests that mothers of anxious children are not overly critical parents in general. Instead they seem to be more critical of a child with OCD than they are of other children in the home, " said Amy Przeworski, assistant professor of psychology. She is the lead author of the study, "Maternal and Child Expressed Emotion as Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, " in the recent journal, Child Psychiatry & Human Development.

Worrying Excessively, Usually Seen As Pathology, May Aid Survival Of The Species

Worrying may have evolved along with intelligence as a beneficial trait, according to a recent study by scientists at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and other institutions. Jeremy Coplan, MD, professor of psychiatry at SUNY Downstate, and colleagues found that high intelligence and worry both correlate with brain activity measured by the depletion of the nutrient choline in theGlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Sackler Institute of Columbia University, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, Psychiatric Institute subcortical white matter of the brain. According to the researchers, this suggests that intelligence may have co-evolved with worry in humans. "While excessive worry is generally seen as a negative trait and high intelligence as a positive one, worry may cause our species to avoid dangerous situations, regardless of how remote a possibility they may be, " said Dr.

Employees Who Feel Obligated To Stay In Their Jobs Become More Emotionally Exhausted

Love it or leave it - if only it were that simple. According to new research from Concordia University, the Universite de Montreal and HEC Montreal, staying in an organization out of a sense of obligation or for lack of alternatives can lead to emotional exhaustion, a chronic state of physical and mental depletion resulting from continuous stress and excessive job demands. Published in the journal Human Relations, the study found that people who stay in their organizations because they feel an obligation towards their employer are more likely to experience burnout. The same applies when employees stay because they don't perceive employment alternatives outside their organization. "Our study examined whether some forms of commitment to an organization could have detrimental effects, such as emotional exhaustion and, eventually, turnover, " says co-author Alexandra Panaccio, an assistant professor in the Department of Management at Concordia's John Molson School of Business.


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