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[ Osteoarthritis Pain, Mobility Improve With Video-Based Home Exercise ]

Osteoarthritis Pain, Mobility Improve With Video-Based Home Exercise

The benefits of exercise in minimizing pain and improving mobility for individuals living with osteoarthritis has been well documented. In a new study presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), 107 individuals with diagnosed osteoarthritis in the knee were randomized to either a DVD-based exercise group, or a control group. The "DVD" group received a DVD-based exercise program, as well as verbal and hands-on exercise instructions, for the first four to eight weeks. The individuals in both groups were evaluated at three, six and 12 months. Participants in the exercise group reportedly exercised 5.3, 5.0 and 3.8 times per week at three, six and 12 month intervals. The improvements in pain and physical function were significantly greater in the DVD group than the control group at all intervals.

Long-Term Success Of Hip Resurfacing May Be Impaired By Excessive Sporting Activity

In hip resurfacing the femoral ball in the hip joint is not removed, but instead is trimmed and capped with a smooth metal covering. Young and active patients with arthritis often choose hip resurfacing over total hip replacement to minimize the risk of hip dislocation, and to preserve the bone for a revision surgery should the primary resurfacing fail. However, the long-term effects of sports on a resurfaced hip were unknown. In new research presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), investigators surveyed 445 patients between one and five years after hip resurfacing. The type of activity, frequency and duration of the sessions, and intensity of participation were documented. Over the next 10 years, each patient's hip status was monitored.

Improved New Procedure For Fixing Damaged Cartilage

A new study has demonstrated that a procedure wherein healthy cartilage is transplanted to fix an area of damaged cartilage (osteoarticular cartilage transplantation or OATS procedure) is superior to the standard of care for repairing cartilage defects. It is thought that fixing such lesions may ultimately help to prevent the onset of osteoarthritis, and get athletic individuals back to sporting activities reliably. The study by Hospital for Special Surgery researchers was reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Feb. 7-11. "Studies have shown that there is only about a 40% return to sport after the microfracture procedure which is the standard of care treatment in the U.S. Over 90% of patients return to sport with the OATS procedure, said Riley J.

Building A Better Hip Replacement With The Help Of Archive Of Failed Joint Replacements

A study by Hospital for Special Surgery researchers has provided the first comprehensive look at just how metal-on-metal total hip replacements are failing in patients around the country. Made possible by what is thought to be the largest archive of failed joint replacements, the research should help doctors develop a better hip replacement for future patients. The study was reported at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Feb. 7-11. "This paper is the first step in what is a path to try to understand what the problems are with metal-on-metal joints, " said Timothy Wright, Ph.D., Kirby Chair of Orthopedic Biomechanics at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). He said that information gleaned from the study should be useful in improving metal-polyethylene implants, the most common hip implant put in patients today.

HPV Vaccine Not Linked To Autoimmune Disorders, Study

A two-year study of nearly 190, 000 girls and women, finds that Gardasil, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine made by Merck & Co, does not trigger autoimmune disorders such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The results are published in the Journal of Internal Medicine. Study lead author Dr Chun Chao, a research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Department of Research & Evaluation in Pasadena, California, said in a statement released on Friday, that: "This kind of safety information may help parents with vaccination decisions." ""These findings offer some assurance that among a large and generalizable female population, no safety signal for autoimmune conditions was found following HPV4 vaccination in routine clinical use, " said Chao. Gardasil is a "quadrivalent" vaccine because it helps protect against 4 types of HPV.


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