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[ Additional Malignancies Detected By Pre-Op MRI In Dense Non-Dense Breasts ]

Additional Malignancies Detected By Pre-Op MRI In Dense Non-Dense Breasts

Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients should undergo a preoperative MRI exam even if their breasts are not dense, a new study indicates. The study found no difference between the usefulness of 3T breast MRI in detecting additional malignancies and high risk lesions in dense versus non-dense breasts. "There are currently no guidelines that define the role of breast density in determining if a preoperative MRI should be performed. However, anecdotally, we know that preoperative MRI exams tend to be ordered more frequently in younger patients and/or patients with dense breast tissue, " said Reena Vashi, MD, one of the authors of the study. The study of 127 patients, conducted at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, found that 3T MRI detected additional malignancies in 26% of patients who had breasts that were not considered dense and in 25% of patients with dense breasts, said Dr.

Patient Recall Rates Reduced By 40 Percent With Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

Adding digital breast tomosynthesis to 2D mammography screening results in a 40% reduction in patient recall rates compared to routine screening mammography alone, a new study shows. The study, conducted at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, of 7, 578 screening mammograms, found that the recall rate was 6.6% for digital breast tomosynthesis plus 2D screening mammography. It was 11.1% for 2D screening mammography alone, said Melissa Durand, MD, one of the authors of the study. Similar recall rates were seen in both groups for masses, but the recall rate was significantly lower with digital breast tomosynthesis and 2D mammography compared to 2D mammography alone for asymmetries and calcifications, said Dr. Durand. The recall rate was 2.8% for asymmetries when both techniques were used compared to 7.

Presence Of Fetal Cells In Women Lowers Risk Of Breast Cancer But Raises Risk Of Colon Cancer

For the first time, scientists have found what could be a causative link between the concentration of circulating Y-chromosome fetal cells in women who gave birth to children of either sex and their risk of later developing breast cancer and colon cancer. The findings show that the presence of fetal cells is a double-edged sword: Women with the lowest concentration of fetal cells were 70 percent less likely to have breast cancer, while women with the highest concentration of fetal cells had a four-fold increased risk for colon cancer when compared with healthy controls. The how and why of this contradictory role of fetal microchimerism is not known and requires more study, according to Vijayakrishna K. (V.K.) Gadi, M.D., Ph.D, an assistant member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and senior author of a study that appears online in the European Journal of Cancer.

Malignancy And Resistance Of Breast Cancer Cells Controlled By MicroRNA

Many breast cancer patients are treated with a drug called tamoxifen. The substance blocks the effect of estrogen and thus suppresses the growth signals of this hormone in cancer cells. When resistance to the drug develops, tumor cells change their growth program: They change their behavior and shape, become more mobile and also adopt the ability to invade surrounding tissue. Scientists working with PD (Associate Professor) Dr. Stefan Wiemann of the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now also observed these changes in tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells. "Resistances to drugs are the main reason why therapies fail and disease progresses in many cancers, " Wiemann explains. "We want to understand what goes on in the cells when this happens so we can develop better therapies in the future.

Women Should Still Have Screening Mammograms Even If They Have 'No Family History'

More than half the women aged 40-49 diagnosed with breast cancer on screening mammography report no family history, a new study shows. The study, conducted at Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC in Rochester, NY of all breast cancers diagnosed between 2000 and 2010, found that 228 out of 373 cancers (61%) were found in women, aged 40-49 with no family history of breast cancer. Seventeen of the 228 patients did have a prior personal history of breast cancer or abnormal cells at a prior biopsy, and were not included in this analysis. Out of 211 women that remained for this study, 135(64%) who did not have a prior personal history of breast cancer or abnormal cells, and had no family history of breast cancer, had invasive disease, said Stamatia Destounis, MD, the lead author of the study.

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