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[ Tailored, Web-Based Intervention Helped Women Understand Options For Breast Cancer Prevention ]

Tailored, Web-Based Intervention Helped Women Understand Options For Breast Cancer Prevention

When women at high risk of breast cancer viewed a customized web-based decision guide about prevention options, they were more likely to make a choice about prevention and to feel comfortable with their choice, a new study finds. Researchers developed a web-based tool called the Guide to Decide, which included general information about breast cancer and personalized information about an individual woman's five-year risk of breast cancer. The guide walked women through two medical options to prevent breast cancer: tamoxifen and raloxifene. Information was tailored to each woman's age and race, and included information on the benefits and risk of tamoxifen and raloxifene as well as how it would affect the woman's breast cancer risk. The study looked at post-menopausal women ages 40-74 who were considered at high risk of breast cancer.

Discovery Of Biomarker Family For Chemo Resistant Breast Cancers

Biomarkers which could help to predict resistance to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients have been identified by researchers from the University of Hull, UK. The researchers found a family of proteins to be twice as prevalent in clinical samples obtained from breast cancer patients who were resistant to chemotherapy than those who were successfully treated. Chemotherapy resistance is a major problem for some types of breast cancer and many patients undergo treatment that does not work, delaying other more suitable treatments and subjecting the patient to adverse side effects in the process. Published online in the Journal of Proteomics, the Hull research identifies a number of potential biomarkers associated with resistance to common chemotherapy drugs, including epirubicin and docetaxel.

Improved Understanding Of Cancer Progression

Researchers at the Hospital de Mar Research Institute (IMIM) have discovered that the protein LOXL2 has a function within the cell nucleus thus far unknown. They have also described a new chemical reaction of this protein on histone H3 that would be involved in gene silencing, one of which would be involved in the progression of breast, larynx, lung and skin tumours. Led by Dr Sandra Peirà and published in Molecular Cell journal, the study is a significant advance in describing the evolution of tumours and opens the door to researching new treatments that block their activity. "LOXL2's action on the intra-cellular level and its interaction with histone H3 stimulates tumour growth. The fact that the protein LOXL2 is an enzyme and is overly expressed in many types of cancer makes it a very good therapeutic target.

Stress And How Breast Cancer Patients Manage It Can Affect Brain Function Even Before Chemotherapy Begins

Women undergoing treatment for breast cancer can experience cognitive declines, such as decreased verbal fluency or loss of memory and attention. Often experienced by patients undergoing chemotherapy, the declines have become known as "chemo brain." However, a health psychologist at the University of Missouri says "chemo brain" isn't always to blame. Stephanie Reid-Arndt, an associate professor and chair of the Health Psychology Department in the MU School of Health Professions, found that women who had undergone surgery for breast cancer but who had not yet received chemotherapy or hormone-replacement therapy experienced similar cognitive deficits as women undergoing chemotherapy. Patients who were stressed and had passive coping strategies to deal with their stress were more likely to experience cognitive declines.

Innovative Breast Cancer Rehabilitation Model

A new supplement in the journal Cancer outlines an innovative model to address a wide range of physical issues faced by women with breast cancer and offers hope for improved function and full participation in life activities for patients through rehabilitation and exercise. A panel of experts proposes a prospective surveillance model (PSM) that could reduce the incidence and severity of breast cancer treatment-related physical impairments. The model was developed over the past year by a panel of internationally known experts, with the support of the American Cancer Society and input from national healthcare professional organizations and advocacy groups. The supplement says the current model of care for people with breast cancer focuses on treatment of the disease, followed by ongoing surveillance to detect recurrence.

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