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[ Optimal Nutrition, Physical Activity Recommended After Cancer Diagnosis ]

Optimal Nutrition, Physical Activity Recommended After Cancer Diagnosis

New guidelines from the American Cancer Society say for many cancers, maintaining a healthy weight, getting adequate physical activity, and eating a healthy diet can reduce the chance of recurrence and increase the likelihood of disease-free survival after a diagnosis. The recommendations are included in newly released Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines for Cancer Survivors, published early online in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. Increasing evidence shows that for many cancers, excess weight, lack of exercise, and poor nutrition increase the risk of cancer recurrence and reduce the likelihood of disease-free and overall survival for cancer patients. "The data suggests that cancer survivors, just like everyone else, benefit from these important steps, " said Colleen Doyle MS RD, American Cancer Society director of nutrition and physical activity and co-author of the guidelines.

Cancer Survivors Told To Exercise, Eat Healthily, And Maintain Ideal Bodyweight

Fruit and Vegetable Market If you are a cancer survivor and you want to minimize your risk of that cancer recurring, or another cancer developing, you should eat a healthy diet, do plenty of exercise, and maintain a healthy body weight, says the American Cancer Society in its new guidelines. Colleen Doyle, MS, RD, Director of Nutrition and Physical Activity at the American Cancer Society, and co-author of the guidelines, says most of the recommendations come down to common sense and have been around for many years. Doyle explained that while working for the American Cancer society, many people have come up to her with questions regarding their present, past and future health. The three most common questions have been: "How can I minimize the chances of my cancer recurring?" "How can I minimize my chances of developing some other cancer?

Younger Women Benefit From Mammography

Researchers from University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have published new findings that mammography remains beneficial for women in their 40s. According to a study published in the May issue of American Journal of Roentgenology, women between ages 40 and 49 who underwent routine screening mammography were diagnosed at earlier stages with smaller tumors than symptomatic women needing diagnostic workup. The paper comes on the heels of the United States Preventive Services Task Force's guidelines from November 2009 recommending against annual screening mammography for women between the ages of 40 and 49. In contrast, the American Cancer Society, American College of Radiology and other professional societies recommend annual exams beginning at age 40.

Common Environmental Contaminant Linked To Rapid Breast Cancer Growth

Studies by researchers at Dominican University of California show that breast cancer cells become increasingly aggressive the longer they are exposed to small concentrations of cadmium, a heavy metal commonly found in cosmetics, food, water and air particles. The study by Maggie Louie, associate professor of biochemistry, shows exposure to cadmium for prolonged periods of time can cause the progression of breast cancer to become more aggressive. Her findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, held in conjunction with the Experimental Biology 2012 conference in San Diego. Breast cancer results from the abnormal growth of the cells in the mammary gland. The normal growth of mammary gland epithelial cells is modulated by the circulating levels of estrogen, a hormone produced by the ovaries.

A Promising Discovery For Breast Cancer Therapy: Human Neural Stem Cells With Tumor Targeting Ability

Could engineered human stem cells hold the key to cancer survival? Scientists at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), the world's first bioengineering and nanotechnology research institute, have discovered that neural stem cells possess the innate ability to target tumor cells outside the central nervous system. This finding, which was demonstrated successfully on breast cancer cells, was recently published in leading peer reviewed journal, Stem Cells. Despite decades of cancer research, cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths in 2008, and breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths each year[1]. In Singapore, more than 1, 400 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 300 die as a result of breast cancer each year[2].

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