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[ New Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines Issued By USPSTF ]

New Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines Issued By USPSTF

According to new guidelines from the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF), published early online in Annals of Internal Medicine, women aged between 21 and 65 should have a Pap smear every 3 years. If women aged 30 to 65 undergo the humanpapillomavirus (HPV) test at the same time as the Pap, they can safely extend the screening interval to once every 5 years. Based on sufficient evidence, the USPSTF advises that women under the age of 21 should not undergo screening for cervical cancer, regardless of sexual history, as it does not lower the incidence of cervical cancer and mortality. In addition, women over the age of 65 also do not require screening if they have had adequate prior screening and are not otherwise at high risk. Task Force Chair, Virginia Moyer, M.

New Guidelines For Cervical Cancer Screening

Women ages 21 to 65 should have a Pap smear every three years, according to new guidelines from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Based on the evidence, women between the ages of 30 and 65 can safely extend the screening interval to once every five years if they undergo the humanpapillomavirus (HPV) test at the same time as the Pap. The guideline is being published early online in Annals of Internal Medicine. The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women younger than 21, as there is adequate evidence that screening in this population, regardless of sexual history, provides no reduction in cervical cancer incidence and mortality. Women older than 65 who have had adequate prior screening and are not otherwise at high risk also do not need screening.

New Recommendations May Be Affected By Providers' Attitude Toward Vaccinating Young Males Against HPV

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found that a health care provider's attitude toward male human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination may influence the implementation of new guidelines. They believe targeted provider education on the benefits of HPV vaccination for male patients, specifically the association of HPV with certain cancers in men, may be important for achieving vaccination goals. These findings appear on-line in the American Journal of Men's Health. HPV infects approximately 20 million men and women in the United States each year. It can cause anal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers in men. Approximately 7, 000 HPV-associated cancers are diagnosed in men annually. Last year, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices issued a revised statement recommending universal vaccination of 11- to 12-year-old males with catch-up vaccinations for males age13 to 21.

How Cancer Risk Is Influenced By Injectable And Oral Contraceptives

In this week's PLoS Medicine, a case-control study conducted by Margaret Urban and colleagues at the National Health Laboratory Services in Johannesburg, South Africa, provides new estimates of the risk of specific cancers of the female reproductive system associated with use of injectable and oral contraceptives. The researchers report that use of these contraceptives is associated with a transiently increased risk of breast and cervical cancer, and that extended use is linked to a reduced risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer.

Pockets Of High Cervical Cancer Rates In North Carolina Identified By Study

A study of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in North Carolina has revealed areas where rates are unusually high. The findings indicate that education, screening, and vaccination programs in those places could be particularly useful, according to public health researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who authored the report. "In general the rates of incidence and mortality in North Carolina are consistent with national averages, " said Jennifer S. Smith, Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and an author of the study published recently online in the journal Preventive Medicine. "However we do see pockets where the rates are among the highest for any of the 50 states. These are the areas where we need to focus our efforts to reduce, and ultimately eliminate, this highly preventable disease.

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