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[ Aspirin - Ability To Prevent Cervical Cancer In HIV Infected Women ]

Aspirin - Ability To Prevent Cervical Cancer In HIV Infected Women

According to a study published in the current issue of the journal Cancer Prevention Research, aspirin should be assessed for its ability to prevent cervical cancer developing in women infected with HIV. Aspirin has the potential to provide considerable benefit for women in Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America, regions where death rates from cervical cancer are extremely high. The study was conducted by global health investigators at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center and cancer specialists in New York, Haiti and Qatar. In Haiti, this easy and cheap solution could be particularly useful, as invasive cervical cancer is a prevalent cause of death among women infected with HIV. In addition, Haiti has one of the highest HIV infection rates in the Western Hemisphere, as well as the highest reported incidence of cervical cancer in the world.

Aspirin Merits Testing For Prevention Of Cervical Cancer In HIV-Infected Women

Research conducted by NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center global health investigators and cancer specialists in New York, Qatar and Haiti suggests that aspirin should be evaluated for its ability to prevent development of cervical cancer in HIV-infected women. The report, published in the current issue of journal Cancer Prevention Research, says this simple and inexpensive solution has the potential to provide enormous benefit for women in the Caribbean, Latin America and Africa, who suffer from a disproportionately high rate of cervical cancer death. Preventive aspirin use could be especially useful in Haiti, where invasive cervical cancer is a common cause of death in HIV-infected women. The country also has the highest reported incidence of cervical cancer in the world and one of the highest HIV infection rates in the Western Hemisphere.

During Ovulation, Females May Be More Susceptible To Infection

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that high levels of estradiol present prior to ovulation decreases immune system effectiveness resulting in growth and promotion of infection A new research report in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that a woman's ovarian cycle plays an important role in her susceptibility to infection. Specifically, researchers from Spain and Austria found that women are most susceptible to infection, such as Candida albicans or other sexually transmitted diseases, during ovulation than at any other time during the reproductive cycle. This natural "dip" in immunity may be to allow spermatozoa to survive the threat of an immune response so it may fertilize an egg successfully. "This could be an explanation why during ovulation females have more risk of being infected with sexual transmitted diseases like HIV or HPV, " said Miguel Relloso, Ph.

2-Year Study Finds Gardasil Does Not Trigger Autoimmune Conditions After Vaccination

Gardasil, the human papillomavirus vaccine that is now recommended for male and female adolescents and young adults, does not trigger autoimmune conditions such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis after vaccination in young women, according to a new study in the Journal of Internal Medicine. Kaiser Permanente researchers used electronic health records to conduct an observational safety study of 189, 629 females aged 9 to 26 years old in California who were followed for six months after receiving each dose of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in 2006-2008. Researchers found no increase in 16 pre-specified autoimmune conditions in the vaccinated population compared to a matched group of unvaccinated girls and women. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine was licensed by the U.

7 Of Americans Have Oral HPV

A study published online in JAMA on Thursday suggests 7% of men and women in the US carry the Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes a distinct form of cancer that affects the part of the throat that sits at the back of the mouth. The study suggests oral HPV infection is predominantly sexually transmitted, and estimates that men are nearly three times more likely to have the virus than women. Maura L. Gillison, Professor in the College of Medicine at Ohio State University (OSU), and others carried out the study. They note in their introduction that we already know oral HPV infection causes a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and that these are linked to sexual behavior. (Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas not caused by HPV are linked to chronic use of tobacco and alcohol).

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