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[ Indications Of A Benefit In Primary HPV Testing ]

Indications Of A Benefit In Primary HPV Testing

Precursors of cervical cancer can be detected and treated earlier / Risk of over-treatment Studies currently available provide indications and a "hint" that precursors of cervical cancer can be detected and treated earlier, and consequently tumours occur less often, in women who underwent testing for human papillomavirus (HPV). In this context, an HPV test can be used alone or in addition to a Papanicolaou test (Pap smear). However, both screening procedures also carry a risk of harm in the form of unnecessary treatments after testing (over-treatment). This is the result of a final report published by the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) on 24th of January 2012. HPV testing is not reimbursed by SHI funds In screening for cervical cancer, the German statutory health insurance (SHI) funds currently offer an annual (cytologic) examination of mucosal cells from a smear taken from the neck of the womb (cervix).

Self-HPV Testing Could Be An Effective Cervical Cancer Screening Method

A study published January 23 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, has found that self-HPV (human papillomavirus) testing, in low-resource settings, may be a more effective way to screen for cervical cancer than liquid-based cytology (LBC) and visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA). Cervical cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers found in women. Each year, around 530, 000 women are diagnosed with the disease, resulting in an estimated 275, 000 deaths. Cervical cytology screening campaigns, which require considerable laboratory infrastructure and medical resources, have helped lower the number of cervical cancer cases in developed countries. However, in developing countries cervical cancer is increasing, with one-seventh of the world's cases in China. As there is currently no nationwide screening program for cervical cancer in China, researchers have suggested that self-HPV testing may serve as an additional or alternative method of primary cervical cancer screening method.

Cervical Cancer Screening Via Self-Collection

Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing of self-collected specimens may be a more effective way to screen for cervical cancer in low-resource settings compared to visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and liquid-based cytology (LBC), according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer found in women with approximately 530, 000 new cases each year resulting in an estimated 275, 000 deaths. In developed countries, cervical cancer incidences have declined, mostly due to cervical cytology screening campaigns, which requires significant medical resources and laboratory infrastructure. Cervical cancer is on the rise in the developing world, with one-seventh of the world's cervical cancer cases in China, where there is no nationwide screening program for the disease yet.

Reducing HPV Infection - Single-Sex Vaccination Has Best Effect

According to a study in PLoS Medicine, the most effective strategy to protect against human papillomavirus (HPV) is single-sex vaccination. They also found that it was preferable to vaccinate females instead of men, given that females are the sex with the highest prevaccine prevalence of HPV infection. Johannes Bogaards, of the VU University in the Netherlands and his team decided to assess whether vaccinating either just females or males, or both sexes would be the best approach to achieve the most effective reduction of sexually transmitted infections amongst the general population. By using mathematical models, they established that particularly for HPV, single-sex vaccination was the most effective strategy for prevention, and that it was better to vaccinate the sex with the highest prevaccine prevalence of HPV infection, i.

HPV Vaccine Does Not Alter Sexual Behavior

According to a national study by The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, contrary to some people's belief, young women receiving recommended vaccinations for the prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and related cancers do not engage in more sexually risky behavior. Nicole C. Liddon, Ph.D., who led the study, explained the motivation behind the study, but advised against drawing too broad a conclusion from it, saying: "Because of perceived risk that young women would behave recklessly, parents, providers, policy-makers and other STD opponents raised concerns when the FDA first licensed and approved the HPV vaccine in 2006. It was clear that we needed to determine whether a relationship existed between being vaccinated against a sexually-transmitted disease and sexual behavior.

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