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[ Potential Link Between Colorectal Cancer Risk, Obesity And Alcohol Consumption ]

Potential Link Between Colorectal Cancer Risk, Obesity And Alcohol Consumption

A case-control study from Newfoundland/Labrador has reported that greater alcohol intake may increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among obese subjects, but not among non-obese subjects. This is not a particularly large study, and only 45-60% of subjects who were recruited by telephone ended up providing data. Further, it is a case-control comparison, rather than a cohort analysis, making bias in the results more likely. In this study, there was no relation of alcohol with the risk of CRC when considering the entire population. However, when subjects were stratified by BMI (<30 versus = 30), the data indicate an increase in CRC risk for obese subjects who were "drinkers" (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0), especially among subjects reporting 5 or more drinks/daily (OR=3.7, CI 1.5-9.

New Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidance Statement Released By American College Of Physicians

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today issued a new guidance statement for colorectal cancer screening. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths for men and women in the United States. The guidance statement and a patient summary appear in the March 6 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, published by ACP. ACP developed this guidance statement to present information to physicians and patients to increase their understanding of the benefits and harms of colorectal cancer screening. "The American College of Physicians encourages adults to get screened for colorectal cancer starting at the age of 50, " said Virginia L. Hood, MBBS, MPH, FACP, president of ACP. "Only about 60 percent of American adults aged 50 and older get screened, even though the effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening in reducing deaths is supported by the available evidence.

New Guidance For Colorectal Cancer Screening

Colorectal cancer is seen as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, for both men and women, in the United States. With that in mind, the American College of Physicians (ACP) has published a new guidance statement in the Annals of Internal Medicine, in regards to conducting colorectal cancer screenings. ACP has created the guidance to give clear, concise information to both doctors and patients, so they can better understand both the risks and benefits of colorectal cancer screening. This is a particularly salient point at the moment, with research showing that there is both too much cancer screening taking place, putting patients at risk and creating unnecessary costs, as well as over treatment and unnecessary treatments being implemented for some types of cancer. Virginia L.

Confirming The Efficacy Of CT Colonography As A Front Line Colorectal Cancer Screening Tool For Seniors

Computerized tomographic (CT) colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy, is comparable to standard colonoscopy in its ability to accurately detect cancer and precancerous polyps in people ages 65 and older, according to a paper published online in Radiology. This is consistent with results of the ACRIN National CT colonography Trial, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2008, which demonstrated CT colonography can serve as a primary colorectal cancer screening option for adults ages 50 and older, but did not specifically break out data for participants ages 65 and older included in the overall analysis. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has deferred coverage for CT colonography primarily citing a lack of data on the exam's performance in Medicare-eligible recipients ages 65 and older.

News From The Annals Of Internal Medicine: March 6, 2012

1. ACP Releases Guidance Statement for Colorectal Cancer Screening* ACP urges adults to get screened starting at age 50 Even though the effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening in reducing deaths is supported by the available evidence, only about 60 percent of American adults aged 50 and older get screened. ACP has released a new guidance statement for colorectal cancer screening recommending that physicians perform an individualized risk assessment for colorectal cancer in all adults. For adults at average risk, physicians should screen for colorectal cancer starting at age 50. For adults at high risk (strong family history, personal history, inflammatory bowel disease) screening should begin 40, or 10 years younger than the age at which the youngest affected relative was diagnosed with colorectal cancer.


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