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[ Chemists Unlock Potential Target For Drug Development ]

Chemists Unlock Potential Target For Drug Development

A receptor found on blood platelets whose importance as a potential pharmaceutical target has long been questioned may in fact be fruitful in drug testing, according to new research from Michigan State University chemists. A team led by Dana Spence of MSU's Department of Chemistry has revealed a way to isolate and test the receptor known as P2X1. By creating a new, simple method to study it after blood is drawn, the team has unlocked a potential new drug target for many diseases that impact red blood cells, such as diabetes, hypertension and cystic fibrosis. Researchers can evaluate the receptor not only in developing new drugs but also re-testing existing medications that could work now by attaching to the receptor. "Scientists are always looking for new 'druggable' receptors in the human body, " Spence said.

Better Treatments For Systemic Fungal Infections May Result From Discovery Of Powerful Drug's Surprising, Simple Method

With one simple experiment, University of Illinois chemists have debunked a widely held misconception about an often-prescribed drug. Led by chemistry professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute early career scientist Martin Burke, the researchers demonstrated that the top drug for treating systemic fungal infections works by simply binding to a lipid molecule essential to yeast's physiology, a finding that could change the direction of drug development endeavors and could lead to better treatment not only for microbial infections but also for diseases caused by ion channel deficiencies. "Dr. Burke's elegant approach to synthesizing amphotericin B, which has been used extensively as an antifungal for more than 50 years, has now allowed him to expose its elusive mode of action, " said Miles Fabian, who oversees medicinal chemistry research grants at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Lung Function In CF Improved By Long-Term Inhaled Dry Powder Mannitol

Adding inhaled dry powder mannitol to standard therapy for cystic fibrosis produced sustained improvement in lung function for up to 52 weeks, according to a new study. Along with the treatment's efficacy and good safety profile, the convenience and ease of administration of mannitol treatment may improve adherence with therapy in these patients. In the double-blind study, which was supported by Pharmaxis Limited, 318 patients were randomized to treatment with 400 mg bid inhaled mannitol or 50 mg bid inhaled mannitol (control group) for 26 weeks, followed by an additional 26 weeks of open-label active treatment. A 50 mg dose was chosen as the control because it was felt it would not be clinically effective, based on an earlier dose escalation study. Mannitol was given on top of a background of typical concomitant therapy such as recombinant human deoxyribonuclease and inhaled antibiotics.

Cystic Fibrosis - Inhaling Mannitol Plus Standard therapy Improves Lung Function

A new study found that the combination of inhaled dry powder mannitol with standard therapy for cystic fibrosis resulted in maintained improvement in lung function for 12 months. In addition to being effective and safe, the easy administration of the treatment might help enhance adherence with treatment in individuals suffering with the condition. The study, supported by Pharmaxis Limited, is published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. The researchers enrolled 318 patients to participate in the double-blind study. Participants were then randomly assigned to receive either 400mg bid inhaled mannitol or 50 mg big inhaled mannitol (control group) for 26 weeks, followed by an additional 26 weeks of open-label active treatment.

Inhaled Dry Powder Mannitol Improves Lung Function In CF

Adding inhaled dry powder mannitol to standard therapy for cystic fibrosis produced sustained improvement in lung function for up to 52 weeks, according to a new study. Along with the treatment's efficacy and good safety profile, the convenience and ease of administration of mannitol treatment may improve adherence with therapy in these patients. In the double-blind study, which was supported by Pharmaxis Limited, 318 patients were randomized to treatment with 400 mg bid inhaled mannitol or 50 mg bid inhaled mannitol (control group) for 26 weeks, followed by an additional 26 weeks of open-label active treatment. A 50 mg dose was chosen as the control because it was felt it would not be clinically effective, based on an earlier dose escalation study. Mannitol was given on top of a background of typical concomitant therapy such as recombinant human deoxyribonuclease and inhaled antibiotics.

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