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[ The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Teams Up With CVS Pharmacy And Warner Home Video To Raise Funds For CF ]

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Teams Up With CVS Pharmacy And Warner Home Video To Raise Funds For CF

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation announced that it will partner with CVS/pharmacy and Warner Home Video for the second year to raise critical funds for cystic fibrosis through the sale of classic family movies this holiday season. From now through Dec. 28, 2010, CVS/pharmacy will sell four animated holiday favorites from Warner Home Video, including "How the Grinch Stole Christmas, " "The Year Without a Santa Claus, " "Charlie Brown's Christmas Tales, " and "The Polar Express." The videos will be sold exclusively at CVS/pharmacy. Five dollars of every video purchased will be donated by CVS/pharmacy and Warner Home Video to benefit the Foundation. "The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is grateful that CVS/pharmacy and Warner Home Video will again join us in the effort to raise dollars to fight cystic fibrosis, " said C.

Growth Defects In Cystic Fibrosis May Start Before Birth

A new study using a pig model of cystic fibrosis (CF) suggests that low levels of a growth promoting hormone at or before birth may contribute to growth defects in patients with CF. The study, led by University of Iowa researchers and published online the week of Nov. 8 in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help predict the severity of the disease in patients and may lead to new therapies for growth defects in people with CF. Growth defects are common in people with CF and have been blamed, in part, on low levels of the growth-promoting hormone called insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Traditionally, the malnutrition and lung inflammation that accompany CF have been blamed for the decreased levels of IGF1. However, even patients who are relatively healthy often do not reach their full growth potential, and newborns with CF often are smaller at birth than healthy babies.

Scientists Develop First Ever Drug To Treat 'Celtic Gene' In Cystic Fibrosis Sufferers, UK

An international research team led by Queen's University have developed a ground breaking treatment for Cystic Fibrosis sufferers. The new drug will benefit sufferers who have the 'Celtic Gene', a genetic mutation which is particularly common in Ireland. The study, which was carried out by scientists at Queen's University Belfast, the University of Ulster, the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust and teams of researchers in Europe, USA and Australia found significant improvement in lung function, quality of life and a reduction in disease flare ups for those receiving the new treatment. The drug (VX-770) is a significant breakthrough not only for those with the 'Celtic Gene', known as G551D, but also for all other Cystic Fibrosis sufferers as it indicates that the basic defect in Cystic Fibrosis can be treated.

ARIKACE trade; Demonstrates Sustained Benefit In Multiple Studies And Over Multiple Cycles Of Treatment Of Pseudomonas Lung Infections

Transave, Inc., reported positive clinical trial results on its lead investigational drug, ARIKACE™ (liposomal amikacin for inhalation), an antibiotic that is entering Phase III development for the treatment of chronic lung infections. The results demonstrate significant clinical benefit and complete the company's Phase II program for the treatment of lung infections due to the bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The data from the Phase II clinical program in CF patients with Pseudomonas lung infections indicate that ARIKACE, delivered at a dose of 560 mg once daily via an eFlow® Nebulizer System from PARI Pharma GmbH for 28 consecutive days, demonstrated superior clinical benefit compared to placebo as measured by significant and sustained improvement in lung function and reduction in Pseudomonas density.

Cystic Fibrosis Gene Typo Is A Double Whammy

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have demonstrated that the gene mutated in cystic fibrosis not only controls traffic on the chloride highway, but also keeps the sodium highway from being overused. An imbalance of salt and water in patients with cystic fibrosis makes their lungs clog up with sticky mucus that is prone to infection. The cause of the offending imbalance is a well-known genetic error, one that blocks the molecular expressway for tiny chloride ions to move across the surface of the lungs. But how does that same gene mutation upset a parallel roadway controlling the flow of the other component of salt, sodium ions? Now, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have found the answer, demonstrating that the gene mutated in cystic fibrosis not only controls traffic on the chloride highway, but also keeps the sodium highway from being overused.

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