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[ The Importance Of Dental Hygiene For Congenital Heart Disease Patients ]

The Importance Of Dental Hygiene For Congenital Heart Disease Patients

Poor dental hygiene behaviours in patients with congenital heart disease are increasing their risk of endocarditis. Teens with congenital heart disease floss, brush and visit the dentist less than their peers. But they have healthier behaviours when it comes to alcohol, cigarettes and illicit drugs. Adults with single ventricle physiology (a type of congenital heart disease) also have poorer dental hygiene practices than their peers despite having better health behaviours overall. The findings were presented in two studies at the 12th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, in Copenhagen, Denmark. "Patients with congenital heart disease are diagnosed and receive their initial treatment in childhood but this does not mean that they are cured, " says the supervisor of both studies, Professor Philip Moons, professor in nursing science at the University of Leuven, Belgium, and guest professor at Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.

'Shock Trauma' To Help Train University Of Maryland Dental Students, Residents

The University of Maryland's School of Dentistry has teamed up with the University of Maryland R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center for training future dentists to respond efficiently and effectively to life-threatening medical emergencies in a dental setting. Medical training is a growing trend in dental education in the United States since the early 1990s. To enhance the School of Dentistry's current course work in prevention and management of medical emergencies, the School has added a partnership with the center known worldwide as simply 'Shock Trauma.' "It is a pioneer of trauma care and is dedicated to treating the critically sick and severely injured with groundbreaking research and innovative medical procedures with one goal in mind, to save lives, " says Thomas Grissom, MD, FCCM, associate professor of anesthesiology at the School of Medicine.

Dental Pulp Stem Cells Transformed By 'Bad Breath' Chemical

Japanese scientists have found that the odorous compound responsible for halitosis - otherwise known as bad breath - is ideal for harvesting stem cells taken from human dental pulp. In a study published today, Monday 27 February, in IOP Publishing's Journal of Breath Research, researchers showed that hydrogen sulphide (H2S) increased the ability of adult stem cells to differentiate into hepatic (liver) cells, furthering their reputation as a reliable source for future liver-cell therapy. This is the first time that liver cells have been produced from human dental pulp and, even more impressively, have been produced in high numbers of high purity. "High purity means there are less 'wrong cells' that are being differentiated to other tissues, or remaining as stem cells. Moreover, these facts suggest that patients undergoing transplantation with the hepatic cells may have almost no possibility of developing teratomas or cancers, as can be the case when using bone marrow stem cells, " said lead author of the study Dr.

Killing Candida With Mouthwash Containing Silver Nanoparticles

Yeasts which cause hard-to-treat mouth infections are killed using silver nanoparticles in the laboratory, scientists have found. These yeast infections, caused by Candida albicans and Candida glabrata target the young, old and immuno-compromised. Professor Mariana Henriques, University of Minho, and her colleagues hope to test silver nanoparticles in mouthwash and dentures as a potential preventative measure against these infections. Professor Henriques and her team, who published their research in the Society for Applied Microbiology's journal Letters in Applied Microbiology today, looked at the use of different sizes of silver nanoparticles to determine their anti-fungal properties against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. These two yeasts cause infections including oral thrush and dental stomatitis, a painful infection affecting around seven out of ten denture wearers.

Gum Healing Promoted Around Exposed Roots By Collagen Matrix

Receding gums often result in tooth sensitivity and can lead to decay of the root and persistent inflammation of the gum. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Head & Face Medicine demonstrates that a novel method using bovine collagen is able to enhance gum healing. This resulted in thicker margins around the tooth and, in over half the cases, complete coverage of exposed roots. Researchers across Germany and Switzerland led by Dr Shahram Ghanaati and the dentist Dr Markus Schlee investigated the possibility of using collagen, extracted from bovine pericardium, to form a support for mending receding gums and exposed roots. The collagen was extracted by a process involving osmotic, oxidative and alkaline treatment. This ensured that the cell walls were broken down, proteins and fats dissolved, and that bacteria, viruses and other pathogens were inactivated and removed.

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