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[ Not All NJ Youngsters Are Equal When It Comes To Use Of Dental Services ]

Not All NJ Youngsters Are Equal When It Comes To Use Of Dental Services

When it comes to receiving dental care, New Jersey has its share of underserved children, according to a Rutgers study. In 2009, more than one-fifth of the state's children between 3 and 18 received no dental care within the previous year. While an improvement over 2001, when almost one-third of the state's children received no care, the study found that foreign-born children and those without health insurance were still likely to forgo visits to the dentist. The Facts & Findings report, New Jersey Children without Dental Services in 2001 and 2009, was prepared by Rutgers' Center for State Health Policy (CSHP). The study used data from the center's 2001 and 2009 New Jersey Family Health surveys (NJFHS) to describe the characteristics of children ages 3 to 18 who received no dental services within a year.

Bone Fractures Can Be Predicted By Dental X-Rays

It is now possible to use dental X-rays to predict who is at risk of fractures, reveals a new study from researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy reported in the journal Nature Reviews Endocrinology. In a previous study, researchers from the University of Gothenburg's Sahlgrenska Academy and Region VĂ stra GĂ taland demonstrated that a sparse bone structure in the trabecular bone in the lower jaw is linked to a greater chance of having previously had fractures in other parts of the body. X-rays investigates bone structure The Gothenburg researchers have now taken this a step further with a new study that shows that it is possible to use dental X-rays to investigate the bone structure in the lower jaw, and so predict who is at greater risk of fractures in the future. Published in the journal Bone, the results were also mentioned in both Nature Reviews Endocrinology and the Wall Street Journal.

New Fluorescent Imaging Sorts Microbiome In Human Mouth

New fluorescent labeling technology that distinguishes in a single image the population size and spatial distribution of 15 different taxa has uncovered new taxon pairings that indicate unsuspected cooperation -- and standoffishness -- between members of the microbe biofilm that covers teeth, according to a presentation at the American Society for Cell Biology's Annual Meeting in Denver. Members of the genera Prevotella and Actinomyces showed the greatest ability to interact, suggesting a central role for them in producing biofilms, reported the researchers. The study, to determine "who's who" in the human mouth was conducted by researchers at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, MA, While both genera are implicated in periodontal disease, species of Prevotella have been recovered from anaerobic lung infections.

News From The Journals Of The American Society For Microbiology

Annual Childhood Flu Vaccines May Interfere With Development of Crossresistance Vaccinating children annually against influenza virus interferes with their development of cross-reactive killer T cells to flu viruses generally, according to a paper in the November Journal of Virology. In this study, first author Rogier Bodewes of Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands and his collaborators collected blood samples from Dutch children with cystic fibrosis, who are vaccinated annually against influenza, and from healthy control children who are not vaccinated, and tested both sets of blood samples for the presence of virus-specific killer T cells. The majority of virus-specific killer T cells are directed to conserved viral proteins, that is, proteins that are very similar among different flu viruses, unlike the rapidly evolving, highly variable proteins which are targets of antibodies induced by influenza vaccines.

3-D Printer Makes Bone-Like Material

It looks like bone. It feels like bone. For the most part, it acts like bone. And it came off an inkjet printer. Washington State University researchers have used a 3D printer to create a bone-like material and structure that can be used in orthopedic procedures, dental work, and to deliver medicine for treating osteoporosis. Paired with actual bone, it acts as a scaffold for new bone to grow on and ultimately dissolves with no apparent ill effects. The authors report on successful in vitro tests in the journal Dental Materials and say they're already seeing promising results with in vivo tests on rats and rabbits. It's possible that doctors will be able to custom order replacement bone tissue in a few years, says Susmita Bose, co-author and a professor in WSU's School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.

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