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[ Phonological Impairment May Be Causing Dyslexia: MIT Study ]

Phonological Impairment May Be Causing Dyslexia: MIT Study

New research shows dyslexia involves difficulty processing language sounds in dyslexic brains, or is being called "phonological impairment." When people recognize voices, part of what helps make voice recognition accurate is noticing how people pronounce words differently. But individuals with dyslexia don't experience this familiar language advantage and this leads to reversing letters and words in both speech and writing. Phonetics is concerned with the physical properties of speech. Listeners are sensitive to phonetic differences as part of what makes a person's voice unique. But individuals with dyslexia have trouble recognizing these phonetic differences, whether a person is speaking a familiar language or a foreign one. Tyler Perrachione with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) says: "Even though all people who speak a language use the same words, they say those words just a little bit differently from one another;

Dyslexia Involves Difficulty Processing Language Sounds In Dyslexic Brains

When people recognize voices, part of what helps make voice recognition accurate is noticing how people pronounce words differently. But individuals with dyslexia don't experience this familiar language advantage, say researchers. The likely reason: "phonological impairment." Tyler Perrachione with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology explains, "Even though all people who speak a language use the same words, they say those words just a little bit differently from one another--what is called 'phonetics' in linguistics." Phonetics is concerned with the physical properties of speech. Listeners are sensitive to phonetic differences as part of what makes a person's voice unique. But individuals with dyslexia have trouble recognizing these phonetic differences, whether a person is speaking a familiar language or a foreign one, Perrachione says.

Children With Dyslexia May Benefit From Early Musical Games

Children with dyslexia often find it difficult to count the number of syllables in spoken words or to determine whether words rhyme. These subtle difficulties are seen across languages with different writing systems and they indicate that the dyslexic brain has trouble processing the way that sounds in spoken language are structured. In a new study published in the June issue of Elsevier's Cortex, researchers at Cambridge have shown, using a music task, that this is linked to a broader difficulty in perceiving rhythmic patterns, or metrical structure. Martina Huss, Usha Goswami and colleagues gave a group of 10-year-old children, with and without dyslexia, a listening task involving short tunes that had simple metrical structures with accents on certain notes. The children had to decide whether a pair of tunes sounded similar or different.

Unexpected Function Of Dyslexia Gene

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that a gene linked to dyslexia has a surprising biological function: it controls cilia, the antenna-like projections that cells use to communicate. Dyslexia is largely hereditary and linked to a number of genes, the functions of which are, however, largely unknown. This present study from Karolinska Institutet and Helsinki University now shows that one of these genes, DCDC2, is involved in regulating the signalling of cilia in brain neurons. "Our discovery presents us with a possible new neurobiological mechanism for dyslexia, " says Professor Juha Kere, who co-led the study with Professor Eero CastrĂ n of Helsinki University. Cilia are hair-like structures that project from the surface of most cells. Their purpose has long remained something of a mystery, but recent research has revealed that the cells use them to communicate and that they play a crucial part in the development of the body's organs.

Those With Reading And Writing Difficulties Find Lifelong Learning Problematic

One Swede in five is considered to have difficulties reading and writing, and the affected individuals tend to encounter great problems in modern society. A new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg addresses their obstacles at various levels and discusses possible solutions. Being attractive in today's labour market requires lifelong learning. However, a person has to be quite good at reading and writing in order to benefit from courses and trainings. Nadja Carlsson, the author of the thesis, interviewed 56 adult students with reading and writing difficulties to shed light on the problems they encounter as adults, in which situations the problems become evident and what the consequences are. Their difficulties are analysed from a lifeworld perspective. Implicit requirements The study shows that adult students with reading and writing difficulties struggle in three areas in particular.

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