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[ Inspiration From The Insect World Leads To Treatment For Vocal Fold Disorders In Humans ]

Inspiration From The Insect World Leads To Treatment For Vocal Fold Disorders In Humans

A one-inch long grasshopper can leap a distance of about 20 inches. Cicadas can produce sound at about the same frequency as radio waves. Fleas measuring only millimeters can jump an astonishing 100 times their height in microseconds. How do they do it? They make use of a naturally occurring protein called resilin. Resilin is a protein in the composite structures found in the leg and wing joints, and sound producing organs of insects. Highly elastic, it responds to exceptionally high rates of speed and demonstrates unmatched resilience after being stretched or deformed. Kristi Kiick, professor of materials science and engineering and biomedical engineering at the University of Delaware, believes this unusual protein may also be a key to unlocking the regenerative power of certain mechanically active tissues.

No Link Between Depression, Nasal Obstruction

While mood disorders like depression or anxiety tend to negatively affect treatment for allergies and chronic rhinosinusitis, the same cannot be said for patients with nasal obstructions such as deviated septum, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. The new study shows mood disorders are not linked to either nasal obstructive symptoms or the failure of nasal obstruction surgery. Results also suggest that those patients with nasal obstruction caused by septal deviation - a blockage of the nasal airway caused by a portion of cartilage or bony septum - who do not have signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis would not benefit from depression screening if nasal treatment is unsuccessful. "Although the literature supports more negative outcomes of allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis patients with mood disorders, our data does not show a similar relationship for septal deviation, " says study author Lamont R.

Tinnitus Linked To Insomnia

Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have found a significant association between the severity of perceived tinnitus symptoms and insomnia. According to the researchers, over 36 million people experience tinnitus - chronic ringing, buzzing, hissing or clicking in the head and ears. The study, presented at the Combined Otolaryngological Spring Meetings in San Diego, found that insomnia can worsen the functional and emotional toll of tinnitus symptoms and that patients suffering from insomnia reported greater emotional distress. Study co-author Kathleen L. Yaremchuk, M.D., Chair, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford, explained: "Tinnitus involves cognitive, emotional, and psycho-physiological processes, which can result in an increase in a patient's distress.

Insomnia Takes Toll On Tinnitus Patients

For the more than 36 million people plagued by tinnitus, insomnia can have a negative effect on the condition, worsening the functional and emotional toll of chronic ringing, buzzing, hissing or clicking in the head and ears, according to a new study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The study shows a significant association between insomnia and the severity of perceived tinnitus symptoms, with patients with insomnia reporting greater emotional distress from tinnitus. "Tinnitus involves cognitive, emotional, and psycho-physiological processes, which can result in an increase in a patient's distress, " says study co-author Kathleen L. Yaremchuk, M.D., Chair, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford. "Sleep complaints, including insomnia, in these patients may result in a decrease in their tolerance to tinnitus.

Home Treatment For Vertigo: 2 Exercises Assessed

A CU School of Medicine researcher who suffers from benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and had to "fix it" before she could go to work one day was using a maneuver to treat herself that only made her sicker. "So I sat down and thought about it and figured out an alternate way to do it. Then I fixed myself and went in to work" and discovered a new treatment for this type of vertigo. More than seven million people in the U.S. can expect to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, a common vertigo disorder, especially as they age. The disorder causes more than a quarter of the vertigo experienced worldwide and has a lifetime prevalence of 2.4 percent. This type of vertigo is unusual because it is a purely mechanical disorder in which particles used to sense gravity accidentally enter the spinning-motion sensors of the ear.

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