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[ Increased Risk For Transplant Patients Who Develop Head Neck Cancer ]

Increased Risk For Transplant Patients Who Develop Head Neck Cancer

Transplant patients who develop head and neck cancer are more likely to be non-smokers and non-drinkers, and less likely than their non-transplant counterparts to survive past one year of diagnosis, according to a new study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. As part of a 20-year review, Henry Ford researchers found cancers of the throat, tonsils and mouth may be more aggressive in transplant recipients as the result of long-term immunosuppressive therapy required to prevent solid organ rejection. Transplant patients in the study who developed skin cancer in the head and neck region were more likely to have multiple lesions, compared to the general public. In all, 2.6% of transplant patients in the study developed some form of head and neck cancer. While the risk for developing head and neck cancer is small, the study serves as an important reminder to all transplant recipients to be vigilant about any changes to their skin, as well as persistent sore throat, ear pain or swallowing issues - all signs of head and neck cancer.

IMRT Improves Head And Neck Cancer Patients' Long-Term Quality Of Life

Patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer report an increasingly better quality of life post-treatment when compared to patients receiving other forms of radiation therapy, according to a study presented at the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium, sponsored by AHNS, ASCO, ASTRO and SNM. Intensity modulated radiation therapy, or IMRT, is a highly specialized form of external beam radiation therapy that allows the radiation beam to better target and conform to a tumor. It is a newer treatment that has become widely adopted for treating head and neck cancer. Prior studies have shown that IMRT decreases the probability of radiation therapy related side effects, including dry mouth and chewing and swallowing problems, but no study has been conducted to measure long-term quality of life in head and neck cancer patients treated with various forms of radiation therapy.

Noise Exposure Can Cause Long-Lasting Changes To Sensory Pathways; Touch-Sensing Nerve Cells May Lead To Future Tinnitus Treatments

We all know that it can take a little while for our hearing to bounce back after listening to our iPods too loud or attending a raucous concert. But new research at the University of Michigan Health System suggests over-exposure to noise can actually cause more lasting changes to our auditory circuitry - changes that may lead to tinnitus, commonly known as ringing in the ears. U-M researchers previously demonstrated that after hearing damage, touch-sensing "somatosensory" nerves in the face and neck can become overactive, seeming to overcompensate for the loss of auditory input in a way the brain interprets - or "hears" - as noise that isn't really there. The new study, which appears in The Journal of Neuroscience, found that somatosensory neurons maintain a high level of activity following exposure to loud noise, even after hearing itself returns to normal.

MRSA Post Tympanostomy Tube Placement Does Not Mean More Surgery Or Complications

According to an investigation published in Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, researchers have discovered that ear discharge and drainage (otorrhea) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA ) after ear tube placement in children is not linked to an increased risk of needing further surgery or other complications, in comparison to a diagnosis of non-MRSA otorrhea. The researchers report: "More than half a million procedures are performed annually to place tympanostomy tubes in children, making this the most common surgical procedure performed in childhood." One of the most common complications of this surgery is otorrhea. In order to find out how common otorrhea in kids is after this procedure, and to figure out the outcomes and risk factors for treatment for MRSA in comparison with non-MRSA infections, Nathan S.

MRSA Post Tympanostomy Tube Placement Not Linked To Further Complications

According to an investigation published in the December issue of Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, researchers have discovered that ear discharge and drainage (otorrhea) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA ) after ear tube placement in children is not linked to an increased risk of needing further surgery or other complications, in comparison to a diagnosis of non-MRSA otorrhea. The researchers report: "More than half a million procedures are performed annually to place tympanostomy tubes in children, making this the most common surgical procedure performed in childhood." One of the most prevalent complications of this surgery is otorrhea. In order to analyze the rate of otorrhea in children after this procedure and to figure out the outcomes and risk factors for treatment for MRSA in comparison with non-MRSA infections, Nathan S.

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