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[ Higher Than Average Death Risk After A Heart Attack Faced By Psoriasis Patients ]

Higher Than Average Death Risk After A Heart Attack Faced By Psoriasis Patients

Heart attack patients with psoriasis are 26 per cent more likely to die from cardiovascular disease, or suffer from recurrent heart attacks or strokes, and are 18 per cent more likely to die from all causes than those without the inflammatory skin disease. That's the key finding of a Danish study published in the September issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine. Researchers studied nearly 50, 000 patients who had experienced their first heart attack between 2002 and 2006, following the 462 patients with psoriasis for an average of 19.5 months and the 48, 935 controls for an average of 22 months. They found that the patients with psoriasis had higher all-cause and specific death rates and say this indicates the need for a more aggressive approach to secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in this group of patients.

Does Exclusive Breastfeeding Prevent Eczema? It Appears Not

There is no clear evidence showing that exclusive breastfeeding for at least four months reduces the chances of a baby eventually developing eczema, researchers reported in the British Journal of Dermatology. The authors, from King's College London, say that in view of their findings, the UK's breastfeeding guidelines with regards to eczema should be reviewed. This study was a joint collaboration between researchers from King's College London, the University of Ulm, Germany, and the University of Nottingham, England. They gathered data on 51, 119 children aged 8 to 12 years from 21 nations. The investigators collected data on breastfeeding, when the baby was weaned, and eczema. Parents had to fill in questionnaires. The children were given a skin examination for eczema, as well as a skin prick test to determine whether they had any allergies.

Psoriasis Drugs Do Not Raise Risk Of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events, It Seems

There is no compelling evidence to link some psoriasis medications with major adverse cardiovascular events, despite a number of preliminary reports that appeared to indicate so, researchers from the Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, Texas reported in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). The authors had analyzed several studies which compared biologic therapies for chronic plaque psoriasis to placebos. Over the last ten years, several studies have shown an association between autoimmune diseases and chronic systemic inflammation, and the subsequent cardiovascular risk that comes with inflammation. Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease. Researchers suggested that controlling inflammation could help minimize cardiovascular illness. Preliminary reports suggested a number of MACEs (major adverse cardiovascular events), including heart attack, cerebrovascular accident or cardiovascular death in RCTs (randomized controlled trials) of individuals with psoriasis treated with anti-IL-12/23 agents.

No Protection Found Against Eczema With Prolonged Breastfeeding: International Study

The largest worldwide study on the association between breastfeeding, time of weaning and eczema in children has concluded that there is no clear evidence that exclusive breastfeeding for four months or longer protects against childhood eczema The largest worldwide study on the association between breastfeeding, time of weaning and eczema in children has concluded that there is no clear evidence that exclusive breastfeeding for four months or longer protects against childhood eczema. The study, led by scientists at King's College London, and published online in the British Journal of Dermatology (BJD), concludes that children who were exclusively breastfed for four months or longer were as likely to develop eczema as children who were weaned earlier. Breastfeeding is still considered by many to be an important strategy to prevent the development of eczema and other allergic diseases, and most health ministries in Europe advocate four months of exclusive breastfeeding to aid allergy prevention.

Distinct Immune Responses Promoted By Skin Sentry Cells

A new study reveals that just as different soldiers in the field have different jobs, subsets of a type of immune cell that polices the barriers of the body can promote unique and opposite immune responses against the same type of infection. The research, published online by Cell Press in the journal Immunity, enhances our understanding of the early stages of the immune response and may have important implications for vaccinations and treatment of autoimmune diseases. Dendritic cells serve as sentries of the immune system and are stationed at the body's "outposts, " like the skin, where they are likely to encounter invading pathogens. When dendritic cells encounter pathogen-associated antigens (molecules that trigger an immune response), they process the antigen and present it to other responding immune cells in an effort to inititate a cellular cascade resulting in clearance of the pathogen.

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