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[ Women Who Drink Beer Regularly More Likely To Develop Psoriasis ]

Women Who Drink Beer Regularly More Likely To Develop Psoriasis

Women who drink beer regularly seem to have a higher risk of developing psoriasis, according to a study published in Archives of Dermatology, a JAMA/Archives journal. The link does not apply to light beer or wines or spirits (liquor), the researchers say. The authors write: Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated skin disease. The association between alcohol consumption and increased risk of psoriasis onset and psoriasis worsening has long been suspected. For example, individuals with psoriasis drink more alcohol than individuals without psoriasis, and alcohol intake may exacerbate psoriasis severity. Alcohol consumption has been shown in previous studies to be linked to certain disease risk - e.g. the risk of gout is higher with beer consumption that wine or spirit consumption. Abrar A.

Psoriasis Linked To Higher Depression, Anxiety And Suicidal Feelings Risk

Patients with psoriasis have a higher risk of developing depression or anxiety, and having suicidal feelings, says a report published today in Archives of Dermatology, a JAMA/Archives (Journal of the American Medical Association) journal. Psoriasis is a dry, scaly skin disorder. Doctors believe that it is genetic and is caused by the immune system being mistakenly "triggered", resulting in skin cells being produced too quickly. The authors state that approximately 1% to 3% of the general population is affected with psoriasis - of which a significant number have not been diagnosed (possibly between 0.4% and 2.3% of the adult population with the condition). The authors wrote: Psoriasis has long been recognized to be associated with potentially adverse effects on mental health. In the 1960s, a popular ad campaign labeled the emotional burden of this skin disease as the 'heartbreak of psoriasis.

Mickelson Announcement Prompts Expedited Filing Of Psoriasis Research Plan With FDA By Energex Systems, Inc.

A research plan that is designed to determine the degree of effectiveness of an experimental non-drug therapy known as ImmunoModulation for the treatment of psoriasis as a primary indication and psoriatic arthritis as a secondary indication, will be filed with the Federal Food and Drug Administration in an expedited manner. In a letter that was delivered to the FDA today, medical technology developer Energex Systems, Inc. requested a Pre - Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) meeting to (i) review the safety and efficacy data that was submitted to the agency as a result of the company's ongoing research, (ii) discuss the hypothesis of the mechanism-of-action that it will rely on to support an IDE for the primary and secondary indication, and (iii) understand the agency's requirements for such an application.

UV-B Treatment May Improve Psoriasis And Vitamin D Levels

Treatment with narrow-band UV-B rays may increase serum levels of vitamin D in the wintertime while clearing psoriasis, according to a report in the August issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Psoriasis affects 1.5 percent to 3 percent of the population, according to background information in the article. Abnormalities in vitamin D metabolism may be partly responsible for the development and worsening of this skin condition. "Most vitamin D is obtained by skin production following exposure to solar UV-B, while less than 15 percent is obtained from dietary sources such as oily fish and fortified foods, " the authors write. Narrowband UV-B treatment has become the standard light therapy for psoriasis. Caitriona Ryan, M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O., then of St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, and now of Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, and colleagues assessed 30 consecutive patients with psoriasis who were treated with narrowband UV-B three times per week until their psoriasis cleared between October 2008 and February 2009.

Skin Condition Associated With Depression, Anxiety And Suicidal Feelings

Individuals with psoriasis appear to have an increased risk of depression, anxiety and suicidality, according to a report in the August issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Psoriasis affects 1 percent to 3 percent of the general population, and estimates suggest 0.4 percent to 2.3 percent of adults have the condition but have not been diagnosed. "Psoriasis has long been recognized to be associated with potentially adverse effects on mental health, " the authors write. "In the 1960s, a popular ad campaign labeled the emotional burden of this skin disease as the 'heartbreak of psoriasis.' However, there have been relatively few studies evaluating psychological outcomes in patients with psoriasis." Shanu Kohli Kurd, M.D., M.S.C.E, M.H.S., and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, studied data from electronic medical records in the United Kingdom from 1987 to 2002.

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