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[ Diabetic? Erectile Dysfunction? Lose Weight And Win, Study Reports ]

Diabetic? Erectile Dysfunction? Lose Weight And Win, Study Reports

New studies support the fact that men with type 2 diabetes suffering from erectile function problems tend to be obese, but by losing a few pounds, patients can recover and be winning again in the bedroom. Gary Wittert, MBBch, MD, FRACP, FRCP, of the University of Adelaide in Australia explains: "Our findings are consistent with the evidence that not only erectile function, but also lower urinary tract symptoms are a marker of cardio-metabolic risk. The evidence that improvement can be achieved by modest weight loss, in particular when a diet is of high nutritional quality, is of public health significance in framing public health messages that resonate with men." The study looked at 31 obese men with type 2 diabetes over 8 weeks. The men received a meal replacement-based low-calorie diet or a low-fat, high-protein, reduced-carbohydrate diet prescribed to decrease intake by 600 calories a day.

Partner Betweenness May Contribute To ED In Couples' Relationships

It seems that if your girlfriend or wife is better friends with your friends than you are, you may have more problems on your hands than just a rocky relationship. There is now evidence that there is an association between erectile dysfunction (ED) in heterosexual men and strong relationships that may exist between their partners and their male friends. Benjamin Cornwell, a professor of sociology at Cornell University and Edward Laumann, a professor of sociology at the University of Chicago, describe the situation as "partner betweennes." This is when a man's female partner has stronger relationships with his besties than he does. The research explains: "Men who experience partner betweenness in their joint relationships are more likely to have trouble getting or maintaining an erection and are also more likely to experience difficulty achieving orgasm during sex.

Antioxidants Of Growing Interest To Address Infertility, Erectile Dysfunction

A growing body of evidence suggests that antioxidants may have significant value in addressing infertility issues in both women and men, including erectile dysfunction, and researchers say that large, specific clinical studies are merited to determine how much they could help. A new analysis, published online in the journal Pharmacological Research, noted that previous studies on the potential for antioxidants to help address this serious and growing problem have been inconclusive, but that other data indicates nutritional therapies may have significant potential. The researchers also observed that infertility problems are often an early indicator of other degenerative disease issues such as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. The same approaches that may help treat infertility could also be of value to head off those problems, they said.

Erectile Function And Libido Improve In Obese Diabetic Men Who Lose Weight

The Journal of Sexual Medicine published a new study which explains that improved erectile function, sexual desire and lower urinary tract symptoms are enhanced by weight loss in obese men with type 2 diabetes. Led by Professor Gary Wittert, MBBch, MD, FRACP, FRCP, of the University of Adelaide, 31 obese men with type 2 diabetes were studied over an 8 week period by researchers. The men were given either a low-calorie meal replacement diet or a low-fat, high-protein and reduced-carbohydrate diet, both of which were prescribed to lower their daily intake of calories by 600. Results revealed that a modest weight loss of 5% produced accelerated reversal of sexual and urinary problems within 8 weeks, together with continual improvements up to 12 months. Wittert reports: "Our findings are consistent with the evidence that not only erectile function, but also lower urinary tract symptoms are a marker of cardio-metabolic risk.

Testosterone Deficiency And Replacement Therapy In Men

Testosterone deficiency (TD), often referred to as hypogonadism, is associated with aging and affects approximately 30 percent of men ages 40-79. To highlight some of the challenges and controversies encountered in diagnosis and treatment of men with TD, the authors of a review article in the American Journal of Medicine introduced a clinical vignette to illustrate the implication of TD on men's overall health and analyzed a number of studies in men receiving Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) to treat TD. The article also provided an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment and addressed the areas of concern and uncertainty involving testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). The clinical vignette depicted a 52 year old man of Caucasian descent who presented with erectile dysfunction, diminished libido and fatigue.

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