Medical News

[ Affordable Care Act's Patients' Bill Of Rights: Nearly All States Have Taken Action ]

Affordable Care Act's Patients' Bill Of Rights: Nearly All States Have Taken Action

As the second anniversary of the Affordable Care Act approaches, a new Commonwealth Fund report finds that 49 states and the District of Columbia have already taken action supporting the law's implementation, such as passing legislation, issuing regulations or other guidance, or actively reviewing insurer filings. Early insurance market reforms in the law include new rules for insurers such as bans on lifetime limits on benefits and dependent coverage for young adults up to age 26. The report, Implementing the Affordable Care Act: State Action on Early Market Reforms, by Katie Keith, Kevin W. Lucia, and Sabrina Corlette of the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute's Center on Health Insurance Reforms, is the first to assess state action on 10 early reforms, including those known collectively as the Patients' Bill of Rights, that went into effect in September 2010.

Treatment Discontinued By One In Four U.S. HIV Patients

Only about 75 percent of HIV/AIDS patients in the United States remain in care consistently, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published online this week in AIDS. The study of patients across the United States is the first to provide a comprehensive national estimate of HIV care retention and information about patients who are most likely to continue their treatment over time. "Helping patients with HIV stay in care is a key way to reduce their chances of getting sick from their disease and prevent the spread of HIV in the community. Our findings show that too many patients are falling through the cracks, " says the study's lead author, Baligh R. Yehia, MD, a fellow in the division of Infectious Disease and the Health Policy Research Program at Penn Medicine.

Due To Language Barriers, Over 100,000 Californians Likely To Miss Out On Health Care

Language barriers could deter more than 100, 000 Californians from enrolling in the Health Benefit Exchange, according to a study released today by the California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, and the UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education. The study presents findings from a UC Berkeley - "UCLA micro-simulation that estimates the likely enrollment in health care reform programs in California. Specifically, the study projects that more than 1 million limited - English proficient (LEP) adults will be eligible to receive tax credits to purchase affordable coverage in the state's Health Benefit Exchange, which expands access to affordable health coverage as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, only 42 percent of eligible LEP adults are expected to enroll in the program.

Among People With Health Insurance, The Recession And High Co-Pays Tied To Fewer Colonoscopy Screenings

The recent U.S. economic recession was the longest and most severe since World War II. During this period, personal spending on health care grew at the slowest rate in over 50 years, suggesting that Americans used less health care. A new study finds that these cut backs were not limited to Americans who lost their health insurance, nor restricted to unnecessary services. Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine found that during the recession, continuously insured Americans underwent fewer screening colonoscopies, a cost-effective, recommended preventive service. The study appears in the March issue of the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The investigators estimated that during the recession period, dating from December 2007 to June 2009, roughly one- half million fewer Americans covered by commercial health insurance underwent colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer than expected based on use in the preceding two years.

How To Find Suitable Private Health Insurance

U.S. Uninsured and Uninsured Rate (1987 to 2008) Private health insurance is the main source of health coverage for the majority of people in the United States. Approximately 58% of all Americans have private health care coverage. For elderly citizens and eligible children and families from low-income households, public programs are the primary source of health cover. Public programs include Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP. TRICARE and the Veterans programs also provide some coverage. If you are not covered by a publicly funded program, or if your coverage is only partial, you will need to have some kind of private health insurance. Since the turn of the millennia, millions of Americans have found themselves with no health cover at all. Most studies place the number of "uninsured" at over 46 million. Tens of millions more have inadequate insurance.

Fast: [10] [20]

Medical News © Nanda
Designer Damodar