Medical News

[ Study Reveals 1 In 10 Canadians Cannot Afford Prescription Drugs ]

Study Reveals 1 In 10 Canadians Cannot Afford Prescription Drugs

One in ten Canadians cannot afford to take their prescription drugs as directed, according to an analysis by researchers from the University of British Columbia and the University of Toronto. The study, published in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) is the first to examine the relationship between drug insurance and the use of prescription drugs in Canada. Researchers from UBC's Centre for Health Services and Policy Research reviewed data from 5, 732 people who answered Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Survey. They found that 9.6 per cent of Canadians who received a prescription reported not filling, failing to refill, or skipping doses for cost reasons. The phenomenon is particularly prevalent for Canadians who do not have drug insurance, with 26.5 per cent reporting not being able to afford their prescription drugs.

In Hospital In-Patient Setting, Uninsured Receive Same Quantity, Value Of Imaging Services As Insured

Insurance status doesn't affect the quantity (or value) of imaging services received by patients in a hospital, in-patient setting, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Approximately 51 million Americans, or 16.7 percent of the population, were without health insurance for some or all of 2009. Lack of insurance is associated with less preventive care, delays in diagnosis and unnecessary deaths. "Americans without health insurance generally receive fewer health care services than those with insurance. Less studied are the specific types of services for which the uninsured face access and utilization differences, " said Kimberly E. Applegate, MD, MS, lead author of the study. The primary data source for the study was the 2003 National Hospital Discharge Survey.

Kaiser Permanente Study Finds Continuous Health Coverage Essential For Patients Managing Diabetes

When patients with diabetes experience interruptions in health - insurance coverage, they are less likely to receive the screening tests and vaccines they need to protect their health. A new study finds that this is true even when patients receive free or reduced-cost medical care at federally funded safety net clinics. The study was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and findings published online in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. "Our study shows that patients need continuous health insurance coverage in order to ensure adequate preventive care, even when that care is provided at a reduced cost, " said Rachel Gold, PhD, MPH, lead author and investigator with the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore. "Most of the services at our safety net clinics are free, but some of the diagnostic tests require a small co-pay that is usually covered by Medicaid, " said Amit Shah, MD, study co-author and Medical Director of the Multnomah County Health Department in Portland.

Medicare And Private Insurance Spending Similar Throughout Texas

Variations in health care spending by Medicare and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas (BCBSTX) are similar throughout the state despite previous research, which found significant spending differences between the private and commercial sector in McAllen, Texas. The latest research results from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), the Commonwealth Fund, and the Brookings Institution are published in The American Journal of Managed Care's December web exclusive issue. Researchers compared variations in spending and inpatient admissions in 32 Texas regions between Medicare and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas, the state's largest health insurer, and did not find significant differences. "This research was based on aggregate data and leaves many questions unanswered about the causes of the variation in Medicare and private insurance spending" said Luisa Franzini, Ph.

Not All NJ Youngsters Are Equal When It Comes To Use Of Dental Services

When it comes to receiving dental care, New Jersey has its share of underserved children, according to a Rutgers study. In 2009, more than one-fifth of the state's children between 3 and 18 received no dental care within the previous year. While an improvement over 2001, when almost one-third of the state's children received no care, the study found that foreign-born children and those without health insurance were still likely to forgo visits to the dentist. The Facts & Findings report, New Jersey Children without Dental Services in 2001 and 2009, was prepared by Rutgers' Center for State Health Policy (CSHP). The study used data from the center's 2001 and 2009 New Jersey Family Health surveys (NJFHS) to describe the characteristics of children ages 3 to 18 who received no dental services within a year.

Fast: [10] [20]

Medical News © Nanda
Designer Damodar