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[ The Protective Effect Of Fiber For Cardiovascular Health, Especially In Women ]

The Protective Effect Of Fiber For Cardiovascular Health, Especially In Women

Foods high in fibre provide good protection against cardiovascular disease, and the effect is particularly marked in women. This is shown in a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The study, which was recently published in the scientific journal PLOS One, involved the study of the eating habits of over 20 000 residents of the Swedish city of MalmÃ, with a focus on the risk of cardiovascular disease. The importance of 13 different nutrient variables (aspects of fibre, fats, proteins and carbohydrates ) was analysed. "Women who ate a diet high in fibre had an almost 25 per cent lower risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease compared with women who ate a low-fibre diet. In men the effect was less pronounced. However, the results confirmed that a high-fibre diet does at least protect men from stroke ", says Peter Wallstrà m, a researcher at Lund University and the primary author of the article.

Preventing, Treating Heart Attacks With Intense Light

There are lots of ways to treat a heart attack - CPR, aspirin, clot-busters and more. Now CU medical school researchers have found a new candidate: Intense light. "The study suggests that strong light, or even just daylight, might ease the risk of having a heart attack or suffering damage from one, " says Tobias Eckle, MD, PhD, an associate professor of anesthesiology, cardiology, and cell and developmental biology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "For patients, this could mean that daylight exposure inside of the hospital could reduce the damage that is caused by a heart attack." What's the connection between light and a myocardial infarction, known commonly as a heart attack? The answer lies, perhaps surprisingly, in the circadian rhythm, the body's clock that is linked to light and dark.

Atrial Fibrillation Should Be Surgically Treated When Performing Cardiac Surgery, Study Suggests

A recent study conducted by Northwestern Medicine® researchers published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, reveals that patients with an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation (A-fib) who are undergoing cardiac surgery, have a lower long-term survival rate compared with patients who are in sinus rhythm, which is the normal beating of the heart. The data also suggests that when surgeons successfully treat A-fib during the previously planned cardiac surgery, the patients' survival rate levels out and becomes the same as someone who never had A-fib. "This study indicates that atrial fibrillation should be surgically treated when a patient is undergoing another cardiac surgery procedure, " said Richard Lee, MD, surgical director of the Center for Heart Rhythm Disorders at Northwestern Memorial's Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute.

Is It Time For Regional Cardiovascular Emergency Care Systems Across The US?

Experts are proposing a new model of care collaboration to diagnosis, treat and follow patients who present with various emergent cardiovascular conditions which require rapid, resource-intensive care and confer a high risk of mortality, in an article published in Circulation. Specifically, cardiovascular emergencies, such as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-STEMI/unstable angina, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), acute aortic dissection (AAD), abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), stroke and acute decompensated heart failure, may benefit from regionalized systems of care. Over the past decade, the Minneapolis Heart Institute® (MHI) at Abbott Northwestern Hospital has implemented regional systems of care for STEMI, OHCA, AAD, non-STEMI and AAA, instituting clinical programs and a supportive network that reflect a burgeoning framework of a regional cardiovascular emergencies system.

DNA From The Heart's Own Cells Plays A Role In Heart Failure

DNA from the heart's own cells plays a role in heart failure by mistakenly activating the body's immune system, according to a study by British and Japanese researchers, co-funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). Scientists from King's College London and Osaka University Medical School in Japan showed that during heart failure - a debilitating condition affecting 750, 000 people in the UK - this 'rogue DNA' can kick start the body's natural response to infection, contributing to the process of heart failure. During heart failure immune cells invade the heart, a process called inflammation. The process makes heart muscle less efficient, reducing its ability to pump blood around the body. Inflammation is usually only activated when the body is facing a threat, such as an infection by a bacteria or virus.


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