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[ Causes Of Cardiovascular Disease Epidemic Identified By Largest-Ever Risk Factor Study In India ]

Causes Of Cardiovascular Disease Epidemic Identified By Largest-Ever Risk Factor Study In India

The Indian Heart Watch (IHW) study has revealed the truth behind the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of key risk factors that are driving the country's growing cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic, in a first-of-a-kind presentation of data at the World Congress of Cardiology. The study assessed the prevalence of different "lifestyle" and biological CVD risk factors across the country - and results show that these risk factors are now at higher levels in India than in developed countries and regions such as the USA and Western Europe. Seventy-nine per cent of men and 83 per cent of women were found to be physically inactive, while 51 per cent of men and 48 per cent of women were found to have high fat diets. Some 60 per cent of men and 57 per cent of women were found to have a low intake of fruit and vegetables, while 12 per cent of men and 0.

Cellular Pathway Linked To Diabetes, Heart Disease

Cardiac researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have found that a certain cellular pathway is linked to obesity-related disorders, like diabetes, heart disease and fatty liver disease. These findings, presented at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology (ATVB) 2012 Scientific Sessions in Chicago, could lead to a potential molecular target for metabolic diseases in humans. Building on previous research, Tapan Chatterjee, PhD, and researchers in the division of cardiovascular diseases at UC found that genetically "deleting" the enzyme histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) completely protected mice against the health consequences of high-fat feeding, like elevated blood sugar, cholesterol levels and fatty liver disease. Chatterjee says HDAC9 has been found to lead to obesity-induced body fat dysfunction.

Risk And Severity Of Liver Disease Reduced By Modest Alcohol Consumption

People with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD) who consume alcohol in modest amounts - no more than one or two servings per day - are half as likely to develop hepatitis as non-drinkers with the same condition, reports a national team of scientists led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. The findings are published in the April 19, 2012 online issue of The Journal of Hepatology. NALFD is the most common liver disease in the United States, affecting up to one third of American adults. It's characterized by abnormal fat accumulation in the liver. The specific cause or causes is not known, though obesity and diabetes are risk factors. Most patients with NAFLD have few or no symptoms, but in its most progressive form, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, there is a significantly heightened risk of cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver-related death.

Heart Disease, Pregnancy And Baby Girls

Women with heart disease are more likely to give birth to female rather than male babies according to a new study presented today at the World Congress of Cardiology. The study found that three-quarters of the 216 children born to 200 pregnant women with diagnosed heart disease were female. The study reviewed the sex of children born to 200 pregnant women with diagnosed cardiac disease. Sixty-four per cent of these women had diagnosed valvular disease, 19 per cent were living with dilated cardiomyopathy, while 14 per cent had uncorrected or significant residual congenital heart disease. These 200 women delivered 216 babies of which 75 per cent were female. "We believe that this is the first study looking at the relationship between gender and the mother's cardiac disease, " said Dr. A. Alizadehasl, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran.

Newly Recognized Feature Of Athlete's Heart Found To Be More Prevalent In Black Male Athletes

Left-ventricular hyper-trabeculation (LVHT) - a feature of certain cardiomyopathies (chronic disease of the heart muscle) - has been found to be more common in black, male athletes according to a new study presented at the World Congress of Cardiology. A study of 692 athletes carried out in the UK, found that LVHT was more prevalent in athletes compared with non-athletes (6.8 per cent compared with 0.4 per cent). None of the individuals with LVHT, however, fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for any form of cardiomyopathy. Moreover, LVHT was found to be significantly more common in afro-Caribbean (black) athletes than in other athletes (13.2 per cent versus 4 per cent). Regular athletic training results in physiological adaptation of a person's heart structure and function. And while many functional changes have been identified, LVHT has not previously been recognized as a feature of "athlete's heart".


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