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[ Maxonidine, A Second-Generation Drug Used For Hypertension Aids Heart Function Independent Of Blood Pressure ]

Maxonidine, A Second-Generation Drug Used For Hypertension Aids Heart Function Independent Of Blood Pressure

Heart failure is the most common cause of death throughout the world, typically the result of chronic high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. As a result, research efforts have focused on an array of approaches aimed at preventing and treating high blood pressure. Recently, Japanese researchers examined the utility of an anti-hypertensive drug, moxonidine, which acts on the imidazoline receptors in the cardiovascular center of the brainstem. They found, using an animal model, that the drug can improve heart function and survival independent of its effect on blood pressure. They also found the drug had a favorable effect on oxidative stress, which is related to insulin resistance, the underlying abnormality in diabetes, which is common in people with heart failure. An abstract presentation about the findings was offered at the meeting Experimental Biology 2012, being held April 21-25 at the San Diego Convention Center.

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension - Phase III SERAPHIN Outcome Study Meets Primary Endpoint

The initial analysis of Actelion's macitentan, a novel dual endothelin receptor antagonist that resulted from a tailored drug discovery process, has met its primary endpoint in a pivotal, long term, event-driven SERAPHIN Phase III trial. SERAPHIN (Study with an Endothelin Receptor Antagonist in Pulmonary arterial Hypertension to Improve cliNical outcome) was the largest randomized, controlled study in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients with a long-term treatment, designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of macitentan, which includes a clearly defined morbidity/mortality primary end-point. Macitentan potentially has several characteristics of major benefits, including increased in vivo preclinical efficacy, as compared with existing ERAs, which resulted from sustained receptor binding and tissue penetration properties, whilst a clinical pharmacology program demonstrated that macitentan has a low propensity for drug-to-drug interactions.

Increasing Blood Pressure Screening May Reduce Incidence Of CVD Events And Death By Up To 3 Percent

A 25 per cent increase in high blood pressure screening in 19 developing countries would reduce the number of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and deaths that occur each year by up to 3 per cent in these countries. The preliminary data presented at the World Congress of Cardiology are the first findings from a new report from Harvard that will be published later this year. The study found that around 900 million people in developing countries have high blood pressure but that only one-third are aware of their disease. Moreover, only 100 million of these people receive treatment, while only 5 per cent of the total are controlled. Against this backdrop, this study was designed to assess the cost-effectiveness of an intervention to increase screening by 25 per cent in developing countries using a non-lab screening tool to treat those with a systolic blood pressure of greater than 140 mmHg and CVD risk of greater than 20 per cent.

Cardiovascular Disease Deaths Could Be Reduced By Tax On Salt

Voluntary industry reductions in salt content and taxation on products containing salt in 19 developing countries could reduce the number of deaths each year from cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 2-3 per cent in these countries. The preliminary data presented at the World Congress of Cardiology are the first findings from a new report from Harvard that will be published later this year. The study set out to assess the cost-effectiveness of two interventions - voluntary salt reduction by industry, and taxation on salt - in 19 developing countries, that represent more than half of the world's population. The required salt reduction levels were modeled on the UK Food Standards Agency experience which set a series of targets for individual food products that have led to a net intake reduction, so far, of 9.

Fighting Harmful Free Radicals Tied To Aging And Cancer With Avocado Oil: The 'Olive Oil Of The Americas'?

Atmospheric oxygen facilitated the evolution and complexity of terrestrial organisms, including human beings, because it allowed nutrients to be used more efficiently by those organisms, which in turn were able to generate more energy. However, as we find out more about how oxygen molecules work inside the body, more attention is being paid to their not-so-good effects, and researchers are seeking ways to thwart them. A number of environmental factors - such as pollution, cigarette smoke and radiation - can turn the oxygen molecules found in mitochondria, the power plants of cells, into free radicals. These unstable molecules destroy virtually all the normal molecules forming cells, such as lipids, proteins and even DNA, by turning them into free radicals, too. This destructive phenomenon is associated with aging and occurs in a variety of diseases, including hypertension and diabetes, which represent major challenges for health systems due to their great social and economic costs.


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