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[ Precancerous Skin Lesions - Advantages Of Laser Removal ]

Precancerous Skin Lesions - Advantages Of Laser Removal

According to a study in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, carbon dioxide laser ablation (removal) may provide an alternative treatment for lentigo maligna, a common pre-cancerous skin lesion, when radiation treatment or surgery is not possible. Lentigo Maligna (LM) is a prevalent pre-malignant skin lesion commonly located in the head and neck region. It is usually observed in older individuals with a history of chronic sun damage and might develop to LM melanoma (LMM), which has the the same prognosis as other types of melanoma. A retrospective case series review was carried out by Haemi Lee, M.D., and colleagues at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada, for all individual diagnoses with primary lentigo maligna who were treated between July 2, 1991 to June 29, 2010 in London, Ontario.

A Photoshop Reality Check: Reality In The Eye Of The Beholder

You know they couldn't possibly look that good. But what did those models and celebrities look like before all the retouching? How different is the image we see from the original? Dartmouth Computer Science Professor Hany Farid and Eric Kee, a PhD student at Dartmouth College, are proposing a method to not only answer such questions but also to quantify the changes. As Farid writes, "Impossibly thin, tall, and wrinkle- and blemish-free models are routinely splashed onto billboards, advertisements, and magazine covers." He says that this is "creating a fantasy of sorts." Going beyond considerations of aesthetics or any dishonesty of photo editors or advertisers, Farid and Kee voice public health concerns. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on November 28, 2011, they point out that these highly idealized images have been linked to eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction in men, women, and children.

Time Of Operation Doesn't Affect Mortality After Surgery

The timing of surgical procedures afternoon versus morning or Friday versus Monday doesn't affect the risk of death after surgery, concludes a study in the December issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). The findings help to alleviate concerns that fatigue may contribute to an increased rate of safety problems for operations performed later in the workday or workweek. The study also shows no increase in mortality in the summer months, when new residents begin work. No Variation in Mortality by Timing of Operation Led by Dr Daniel I. Sessler of The Cleveland Clinic, the researchers analyzed the outcomes of 32, 001 elective surgeries performed from 2005 to 2010. The risk of death within 30 days after surgery was analyzed according to time of day of the procedure (from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm), day of the week, and month of the year.

Advanced Age Should Not Deter Women From Breast Reconstruction After Cancer

Breast cancer is on the rise and 48 percent of all breast cancers occur in women older than 65, but very few of them choose to have breast reconstruction. A new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center sought to determine if breast reconstruction after mastectomy is safe for older women. The answer is yes. "The removal of a breast has implications for the psychological, social and sexual well-being of the patient, establishing the need that reconstruction should be offered, " said Marissa Howard-McNatt, M.D., assistant professor of surgery at Wake Forest Baptist. "However, little is known about rates of reconstruction in elderly women after breast cancer." The study appears in the December issue of The American Surgeon journal. Howard-McNatt and colleagues reviewed data from patients treated at Wake Forest Baptist over a 10-year period, evaluating 89 women over age 60 who had undergone mastectomy and reconstruction.

Laser Removal May Be Advantageous For Treating Precancerous Skin Lesions

Carbon dioxide laser ablation (removal) may have a role as an alternative treatment for a common precancerous skin lesion known as lentigo maligna when surgery or radiation therapy is not feasible, according to a report in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. According to background information in the article, lentigo maligna (LM) is a common premalignant skin lesion typically seen in older populations with a history of chronic sun damage and it is commonly located in the head and neck region. The lesion may progress to LM melanoma (LMM), which has the same prognosis as other forms of melanoma. Haemi Lee, M.D., and colleagues at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada, conducted a retrospective case series review of all patients with primary lentigo maligna diagnosed and treated in London, Ontario between July 2, 1991 and June 29, 2010.

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