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[ Botox Has Effects On Unintended Muscles ]

Botox Has Effects On Unintended Muscles

According to a study in the January issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, the official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS), Botox (Botulinum neurotoxin type A) has previously unsuspected 'systemic' effects on muscles other than the ones it's injected into. Researchers have demonstrated in experiments with rats that the lasting effect of Botox injections also occurs in muscles distant from the injection site, and that it appears to cause a unique effect on the muscle responses to a commonly used muscle relaxant, which could impact the monitoring of a patient during surgery or mechanical ventilation. Research leader Dr. Christiane G. Frick of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and her team examined the immediate, delayed, local and distant effects of Botox injections by conducting various experiments.

Botox Affects Other Muscles, As Well As The Intended Ones

According to an investigation published in the January issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS), researchers have discovered that injecting Botox (botulinum neurotoxin type A) affects muscles other than those it's injected into. The study, led by Dr Christiane G. Frick of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, demonstrates that rats injected with Botox display lasting effects on muscles after injection, even in muscles far from where Botox was injected. Furthermore, Botox appears to have "unique" effects on the way muscles respond to a commonly used muscle relaxant. This may affect monitoring patients during mechanical ventilation or during surgery. 'Distant' Effects of Botox The team conducted tests in order to evaluate the local and distant, immediate and delayed effects Botox has.

Treating Crows Feet With Botulinum Neuromodulators

An investigation published Online First by the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals reveals that the onset action of two botulinum neuromodulators both improved the appearance of crow's feet (lateral orbital rhytids) even though one appeared to produce greater improvement than the other. The investigators said: "Botulinum toxin is a potent neuromodulator produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Botulinum toxin exerts its effect by blocking the action of acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter), thus producing a state of functional denervation." 77 women and 13 men with moderate-to-severe lateral orbital rhytids were enrolled to participate in the study by Kenneth C.Y. Yu, M.D., from The Maas Clinic, San Francisco, and the University of California San Francisco and colleagues.

Brigham And Women's Surgeons Describe 3 Successful Full Face Transplants

In March 2011, a surgical team at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) performed the first full face transplantation (FFT) in the United States and went on to complete a total of three FFTs this year. Now, in the first research publication to evaluate FFT in the US, and largest series worldwide, the researchers describe details of patient preparation, novel design and execution of the operation as well as unique immunosuppression protocol allowing for lowest long-term maintenance drug regimen. They also share details of the early functional outcomes and demonstrate FFT as a viable option in the treatment of severe facial deformities and injuries. This research is published in the New England Journal of Medicine. "Unlike conventional reconstruction, facial transplantation seeks to transform severely deformed features to a near-normal appearance and function that conventional reconstructive plastic surgical techniques cannot match, " said lead author Dr.

Treating Crow's Feet - Botulinum Neuromodulators

An investigation published Online First by the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery reveals that the onset action of two botulinum neuromodulators both improved the appearance of crow's feet (lateral orbital rhytids), even though one appeared to produce greater improvement than the other. The authors said: "Botulinum toxin is a potent neuromodulator produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Botulinum toxin exerts its effect by blocking the action of acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter), thus producing a state of functional denervation." 77 women and 13 men with moderate-to-severe lateral orbital rhytids were enrolled to participate in the study by Kenneth C.Y. Yu, M.D., from The Maas Clinic, San Francisco, and the University of California San Francisco and colleagues. Participants received an injection of onabotulinumtoxinA, 10 U, on one side of their face and abobotulinumtoxinA, 30 U, on the other side of their face.

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