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[ Hospice Caregivers Need Routine Care Interventions ]

Hospice Caregivers Need Routine Care Interventions

A study led by the University of Kentucky researcher Elaine Wittenberg-Lyles found that hospice family caregivers are "second order patients" themselves and require their own unique care needs. The study, published in a recent issue of Qualitative Health Research, assessed the individual stressors that caregivers experience. The researchers recorded discussions between hospice caregivers and the intervention team. The caregivers were asked to identify and describe the most pressing problems or concerns they faced. The study enrolled hospice caregivers who were 18 years of age or older and who did not have functional hearing loss, had mild to no cognitive impairment, and had at least a sixth grade education. In addition, all participants had to have access to a standard phone line. In total, the team collected discussions from 81 participants.

Revision Of Federal Nursing Home Quality Reporting System: Nursing Home Quality Scorecards Don't Tell The Whole Story

The scoring system government agencies use to rate nursing home quality does not provide an adequate evaluation because they do not take into account the degree of cognitive impairment of their patient populations and whether facilities include a specialized dementia unit according to a new study. Focusing on statistics from Minnesota, researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine and the Regenstrief Institute report on the inadequacy of quality of care indicators for nursing home residents with behavioral and psychological systems related to dementia in a study published in the November 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. "Measuring quality of care is complicated, but we really need to do a better job, " says Arif Nazir, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at the IU School of Medicine and the study's first author.

Home Treatment Of Pneumonia Better Than Hospital Care, Groundbreaking Study Reveals

In a breakthrough study published online in The Lancet, researchers from Boston University, Save the Children and the WHO found that young children treated at home for severe pneumonia by Pakistan's network of "lady health workers" were more likely to get well than children referred to health facilities. The finding could save thousands of children's lives every year. Pneumonia is the leading cause of death of young children around the world, killing some 1.4 million children under age 5 annually, 99 per cent of them in developing countries. In the study, based in the Haripur district of northern Pakistan, researchers found that home-based treatment of severe pneumonia by a corps of trained "lady health workers" armed with five days' worth of oral amoxicillin reduces treatment delays and failures compared to standard practice: administering one dose of antibiotics and referring a child to a hospital or clinic for intravenous drugs.

Home Visits Benefit New Mothers, Newborns

Home nursing visits are as safe and effective as office-based care for initial post-delivery well-baby check-ups, according to medical researchers. "Generally, moms and babies are discharged from the hospital less than 48 hours after delivery, " said Ian Paul, M.D., professor of pediatrics and public health sciences, Penn State College of Medicine. "A follow-up appointment is scheduled, and they don't always show up. This is unsettling because it is such an at-risk time of life for both baby and mom." Home nursing visits solve the problem of whether or not mom and baby show up for the appointment -- and also have other modest benefits. Nurses can make visits any day of the week, while many doctors' offices are not open or have abbreviated hours on the weekend. Home visits can be more comfortable for the mother.

Post-Cardiac-Arrest Discharge Improved By Better Understanding Of Neurologic Defects

Delay in initiation of therapeutic hypothermia and delay in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), evidenced by a palpable pulse or a measurable blood pressure, were both associated with poor neurologic outcomes in post cardiac arrest patients, according to a study presented Nov. 14 at the at the American Heart Association (AHA) scientific sessions in Orlando, Fla. Also, caregivers who have an appropriate understanding of the patient's post cardiac arrest neurologic state could ensure better patient management at discharge. The researchers were seeking to determine whether there were differential rates of neurologic outcomes in post cardiac patients by time to initiation, depth and duration of therapeutic hypothermia. They based the neurologic outcomes on the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC), which is ranked from 1 to 5, with 1 identified as "good, " and 3 to 5 identified as poor.

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